Inventory - Miscellaneous Obsoletes and Southern States - Virginia:
 

Below are my current offerings in Virginia. Visit the Terms page to order.


 

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Abbreviation Key


      All notes in stock unless otherwise indicated. Hundreds more notes from all Southern States to be added as time permits. If you don't see it; please feel free to ask. Odds are I have it. 99% of my inventory is NOT listed on the Web Site.    

Once a scan comes up; click the center square for a larger image.

VA                VIRGINIA
    VA  $20

  State of Virginia

       CR 3 (1861)

  Richmond

Serial # 3857. Brown ink date of July 15. Great trim, color and eye appeal. Printed upon very thin paper, the Cr. 3 is extremely difficult to locate this nice. The note faces up CU, although does have a few light folds. A true "sleeper".   XF  $600  

Reverse

   VA  $20

  State of Virginia

       CR 3 (1861)

  Richmond

Serial # 853. Brown ink date of August 1. The largest margins I've ever seen on this issue. Usually trimmed quite close. Problem free and a great value.    VF  $475  

Reverse

   VA  $10  State of Virginia 

  

       CR 4 (1861)

  Richmond

Same serial # as date of note-1861

Serial # 1861. An interesting combination with the serial number being the same year as the note is dated; 1861. An obscure fact, although only three other notes could bear this serial number. No folds and cut a tick tight at the upper right front. 1861 smaller denomination issues are tough to locate in high grade.   UNC+  $495  

Reverse

  Note.  I have far too many 1862/3 State of Virginia $50, $20, $10, $5 and $1 issues in stock to list here. This includes watermarked notes as well. No 1862 $20 notes were issued from the State of Virginia. Many would be redundant. If you have an interest in any of these that you do not see here, please feel free to drop me an email. I see no point in listing 25 $100 notes or 60 $50 notes and who knows how many $1,$5 and $10 notes.
   VA  $100    State of Virginia 

  

       CR 6 (1862)

    Richmond

 

 

    X-John J. Ford

 

 

 

       GEM NEW

Serial # 2912. Printed date of October 15, 1862. Virginia Governor Letcher within oval at center. Washington to left and Indian maiden in oval to right. Large orange "C" protectors. Plain back. Another incredible note from the famous John J. Ford collection which took Stacks 16 catalogs to sell. The quality of this note is impossible to convey in a scan. Incredible, very deep embossing which literally jumps out at you when viewing the note in person is not seen in the scan. The embossing this note bears is better than I have encountered upon any obsolete or CSA note of ANY kind I have ever handled. Razor sharp corners, clean and as crackling crisp and one could ever hope for. If there exists a better Cr-6; I have yet to see it. One cannot cut corners and locate a note like this one...in other words, there is no Santa Claus and the old adage, you get what you pay for definitely applies here. Provenance: John J. Ford via New Netherlands Coin of NYC, 1954.

  GEM CHOICE

UNCIRCULATED

  $400

 

Reverse

    VA  $100    State of Virginia 

  

       CR 6 (1862)

 

 

    Richmond

Serial # 2938. Printed date of October 15, 1862.

Governor Letcher in center. Washington to left and Indian maiden to right. Orange "C" protectors. Plain back. Bright, clean and crisp. Not one pinhole or problem. Trimmed a hair tight at the bottom, as many of these are. Superb eye appeal and a great note for someone who wants a high quality 1862 Virginia $100 piece without spending the amount required to locate a gem...if and when that rare opportunity arises. Original embossing remains; although this note does bear light handlng and three light folds.

Extremely

Fine

 

 

MKT

Grade:

XF-45

  SOLD

 

Reverse

   VA  $ 50    State of Virginia 

  

       CR 7 (1862)

    Richmond

Seral # 2530. While not rare; locating a pristine example such as this one is much tougher than one might think. A product of Keatinge & Ball of Columbia, SC. Same vignette as that used on CSA T-17. Fully framed and simply a lovely note with superb eye appeal. Not one single fold, blemish or problem.

CHOICE

    CU

 $260

 

Reverse

  VA  $ 50    State of Virginia 

  

       CR 7 (1862)

 

 

    Richmond

Serial # 3461. Depiction of Virginia Governor James M. Mason to far left. "50" in scalloped die to right. Three females; Prosperity, Commerce and Navigation to lower right (CSA T-17). A lovely, bright white, fully framed example of the issue. With a magnifying glass, I detect two very small pinholes at the "N" and "D" of "Richmond". These are near impossible to see. Superb clarity and contrast add to this note's choice eye appeal. Very light handling and two, as made; very small sheet crimps are noted upon the back. While these were printed in relatively large numbers; locating an example as appealing as this one is much tougher than one might think.   AU  $190  

Reverse

  VA  $ 50    State of Virginia 

  

       CR 7 (1862)

 

 

    Richmond

Serial # 3623. Printed date of October 15, 1862.

Virginia Governor James M. Mason to far left. "50" in scalloped die to right. Three females; Prosperity, Commerce and Navigation to lower right (CSA T-17). Simply a gorgeous note from the famous Ford collection. The red line which may be seen at the top, just between the "a" and "T" of Virginia Treasury is in fact an alignment line. Often seen upon the CSA T-41 and several other obsolete and CSA issues; it was used as a guide by those when trimming the notes from the sheet. Most often, it is not seen on the finished product. This issue was often times printed upon very thin paper which makes it most difficult to locate an example free of handling, sheet crimps or the like. The black frame line is hard to see at the upper left. Striking color and contrast. Not near as easy to locate as many think without problems. Superb eye appeal and impeccable provenance.

 Extremely Fine+

 

 

MKT

Grade:

AU-55

 $175  

Reverse

  VA  $ 50    State of Virginia 

  

       CR 7 (1862)

 

       Richmond

Serial # 155. Printed date of October 15, 1862.

Virginia Governor James M. Mason to far left. "50" in scalloped die to right. Three females; Prosperity, Commerce and Navigation to lower right (CSA T-17). Some light foxing. Three digit serial number.  This note circulated; although very little. As crisp as a choice cu note. Not one single pinhole or other problem. Very affordable and a very respectable example of this 1862 Virginia $50 note.

 Ch Very Fine

 

Mkt

Grade:

XF-40

 $145  

Reverse

   VA  $ 10    State of Virginia 

  

       CR 8

    Richmond

 

  October, 1862

Serial # 3293. Engraved date of October 15, 1862. Ceres seated at center. Vulcan to far left. Portrait of Virginia Governor John B. Floyd within oval at lower right. Governor Floyd was in command of Ft. Donnelson upon it's fall. Green "X" and "TEN" overprints. Plain back. Thin, non watermarked paper. A superb example of this somewhat common issue; although a note that is much more difficult to locate this pristine than is thought. Just because notes were printed in fairly good sized numbers by no means translates into loads of choice survivors. This issue was printed early; to wit, in 1862. Consequently, most are worn and have problems. I am here offering several Cr 8's from my personal collection which I have had for more than 30 years. Simply an immaculate piece of American history.

  GEM

    CU

  $180

 

Reverse

    VA  $ 10    State of Virginia 

  

       CR 8

    Richmond

 

  October, 1862

 

 

 

 

 

 

    X-John J. Ford

Serial # 12681 and consecutive to the above note. Plate "B". Another note I personally acquired from the Ford collection many years ago. Color, trim and beauty beyond description. While I am at a loss as to how the grading services number high grade notes; I cannot imagine this note being graded less than 66 or 67. Adding to the appeal of the note; Ford has written the Criswell number, the Bradbeer number and the Affleck number upon the back. He was known as a meticulous record keeper and this work of art substantiates that. While PMG for some unknown reason denotes "Annotations" upon their grading service holder when such numbers are encountered; PCGS does not. PMG obviously does not have a clue as to how this hobby evolved; wherein it was common practice to do just what Ford did. Reference material was limited, the pieces were never legal tender and the fact that the type number is written upon the note should in no way conjure up any statement which could potentially be viewed as negative. A magnificent Cr 8 that would be near impossible to duplicate.

GEM

  CU

 $185  

Reverse

    VA  $ 10    State of Virginia 

  

       CR 8

    Richmond

  October, 1862

    X-FORD

Serial # 12681 and the same as the note above. Plate "C". A true work of art from the same sheet as the note above. Only in Ford's day during the 1950's could such a feat be accomplished. Simply an incredible 155 year old piece of Americana with each and every detail of the engravers art bright, vivid and bold.  GEM

  CU

 $185  

Reverse

    VA   $ 10    State of Virginia 

  

       CR 9 (1862)

 

 

 

Choice four note cut

sheet via the

John J. Ford collection!

Serial # 11073. Plate positions A thru D. Four notes. All watermarked "TEN". An original, complete four note cut sheet of Cr 9's from the famous John J. Ford collection. I acquired this cut sheet at the Ford "X" sale held in Atlanta, GA in 2005. All notes are just as they were when cut from the sheet. None have folds. Why own a cut sheet of Virginia Cr-9's ? Obviously, none are available today. What you see here is a tiny glimpse of "what it used to be like" for collectors of the 50's and 60's. If an individual gave me a million dollars and asked me to find a cut sheet of these today; I could not do it. There is much to be learned from a cut sheet. As no uncut sheets of Cr-9's are known, we can see how the watermarks aligned; how much care (or how little) was taken in the trimming of the notes and much, much more. If one wants to own an important numismatic property, here is your chance. I seriously doubt there is another complete cut sheet (much less an uncut sheet) of these on the planet. Can Cr 9's be acquired for less money individually? Of course they can. My point is this; if one is going to own a numismatic property; why not own a piece of numismatic history as well. Many do not realize the significance of Ford's holdings. Consequently; I have set forth the introduction from Stacks catalog from this actual auction. The information which appeared in the catalog that immediately preceded the sale of these very notes is set out in "reverse". A magnificent opportunity to acquire notes once owned by one of the greatest collectors of all times....John J. Ford. I will set out each note individually below. All are numbered 11073. Plates A thru D.  All UNC

    to CH CU

    

 4  Notes

Complete,Original

       Sheet

 $1,100  

Reverse

Serial # 11073. Plate "A".

 GEM

  CU

 

Reverse

Serial # 11073. Plate "B".

  GEM

    CU

 

Reverse

Serial # 11073. Plate "C".   UNC+  

Reverse

Serial # 11073. Plate "D". Bottom of sheet "trim line" present.  UNC  

Reverse

   VA  $10    State of Virginia 

  

       CR 10 (1862)

    Richmond

 

 

  Watermarked 

         FIVE

 

 TRUE SOUTHERN

  STATES RARITY

 

PCGS Very Choice

      New  64

Serial # 2950. Printed date of October 15, 1862. Central vignette of Prosperity seated between two green protectors. Portrait of Thor on shield to left and Virginia Governor John B. Floyd in oval to lower right. Two, green "TEN" and "X" protectors. Plain back. A magnificent example of this true Southern States rarity and to my knowledge, the finest known extant today. Watermarked "FIVE".  This paper was originally manufactured for the Bank Note Companies to prevent fraud or "raising" of notes. For example, "TEN" watermarked paper was to be associated with a $10 denomination note. Likewise; "FIVE" watermarked paper was to have a $5 note printed thereon. The paper this note (and the "TEN") was printed upon was seized by the Confederacy from the American Bank Note Company branch in New Orleans at the outset of the Civil War and sent to Keatinge & Ball, the printer of this note. While every effort was made by Keatinge & Ball to comply with the above, this note is an example of printing the wrong note on the wrong paper....much akin to a "mint error" upon a coin. To the printer's credit, it happened very, very rarely. See the $10 cut sheet above. Each and every note of the four note sheet has the correct "TEN" watermark. Very likely attributable as well to the very small amount of "FIVE" watermarked paper seized. These are much, much more scarce than originally thought. Some of this paper found it's way to the CSA T-33. Incredibly well preserved; this note had the exact same opportunity to circulate as did the other three notes upon the sheet. A true miracle of survival. The four or five high grade examples known today begin with serial number four and are only four digits long. This is the first Cr 10 I have seen or heard of which begins with the number two and also the lowest numbered. In all probability; the other three notes from this same sheet entered circulation and likely do not survive today. As the 1862 Virginia $10 note was produced by the thousands; it is quite obvious that the supply of watermarked paper was utilized rapidly. The "FIVE" watermarked paper is many, many multiples more rare than the "TEN". The watermark is bold, vivid and can be seen from across the room. When looking at the note, it reads "FIVE" from left to right; just as we would want it to. I could go on for ages about a great Southern rarity such as this, but space limits me here. Suffice it to say herein lies an opportunity to acquire the finest known Cr 10; a great Southern States rarity. I certainly don't know where or when one could ever find a nicer piece.

PCGS

Very Choice New 64

 

 $2500  

Reverse
Pic 2

    VA  $ 10    State of Virginia 

  

       CR 11

    Richmond

 

  October, 1862

 

   Watermarked

  "T.C.C. & Co."

Serial # 6458. Engraved date of October 15, 1862. Thin paper. Same vignettes as Cr 8 thru Cr 10. A splendid example of this tougher watermarked 1862 Virginia $10 issue. Cut a tick close at the bottom margin; although much of the black frame line is present. The black background of the scan prevents one from seeing it. A most attractive and appealing example of this tougher watermarked note. The piece saw very slight circulation, as is evidenced at the upper left back. A most desirable Virginia State Civil War issue. Extremely Fine  $215  

Reverse

    VA  $ 5    State of Virginia 

  

       CR 13 (1862)

    Richmond

 

 

 

 

 

 Rare Vignette Shift

 Neat Printing Error

Serial # 19154. Dated March 13, 1862. Central portrait of the VA Public Account Auditor, Jonathan M. Bennett within oval. Scene from the Virginia State seal to far right. "FIVE" within green protector to left. Plain back. Simply a gorgeous note. A first for me; in that the black ink portion of the note is shifted higher than it should be. This places our very "close up" look at the Virginia State seal outside of the frame line at the right. It also seems to be tilted somewhat as well. This portion of the note should be within the frame line of the note. Notice the distance at the bottom between the State Seal vignette and the bottom frame line. I have never before encountered this upon a VA Cr 13. To further enhance the desirability of this rare printing error is the fact that it is seen upon a high grade piece. Such an error would have been detected right away during the printing process and stopped with the next sheet. This is likely the reason the example offered here is the only such note I have ever had the privilege of seeing. A super piece, bearing immaculate color and eye appeal. Were this a Confederate note bearing such an obvious printing error, it's cost would likely be many, many multiples of the price listed here. Excessively rare and perhaps unique.   CU  $375  

Reverse
Pic 2

    VA  $  5

  State of Virginia

    CR 14 (1862)

  Richmond

 

 

   Watermarked:

  EXCEPTIONALLY VIVID WATERMARK

Hodgkinson & Co.

Wookey Hole Mill

 

 

 

  PCGS XF 45 PPQ

Serial # 27654. Printed date of Mar. 13,1862. Central portrait of Virginia Public Account Auditor, Jonathan M. Bennett in center. Oval rendition of Virginia State seal to right. Plain back. Watermarked Hodgkinson & Co. Wookey Hole Mill. While the watermark upon this note shows up in the scan better than the note below; both possess very strong watermarks. High grade "Wookey's" such as this note exist today via sheer luck. No one cared that the note bore a Wookey Hole Mill watermark in 1862, some 154 years ago. This piece could just as easily be very good, torn or damaged. Thankfully, and very fortunately for us; it somehow survived in this grade. Graded Extremely Fine 45 PPQ (Premium Paper Quality) by PCGS; this note is much, much more close to an AU piece. I have seen notes in AU 58 holders that were not nearly as nice as this piece. Superb eye appeal and trim. A true prize; as the rare and extremely desirable "Wookey Hole Mill" watermark may be seen "from across the room". The W/M is readily visible from the front as well; reading just as one would want it to, from left to right. This note likely never saw circulation, bearing  only the faintest of folds, which require viewing the note at an exact angle and bright light to barely make out. Simply a marvelous piece with the supply most definitely very, very limited; especially this nice. Gorgeous.

PCGS XF 45 PPQ

 

Premium

Paper

Quality

 

 

My Grade: AU

 $875  

Reverse

   VA  $ 5

  State of Virginia

    CR 14 (1862)

 

  Richmond

Watermarked:

 

 

Hodgkinson & Co.

Wookey Hole Mill

 

 

 

 

  PCGS VF 30

Serial # 23019. Printed date of Mar. 13,1862. Central portrait of Virginia Public Account Auditor, Jonathan M. Bennett in center. Oval rendition of Virginia State seal to right. Plain back. Watermarked Hodgkinson & Co. Wookey Hole Mill. One of; if not the most desirable watermarks extant. This printing facility was located in Great Britain, in the town of Wookey Hole. First opened in the year of 1412 and continuously in operation until the 1950's; some 500 years plus! Very little of this paper made it through the Union blockade of Southern ports. Printed upon thick paper, this note bears one of the strongest, most vivid examples of the watermark I have seen. While one cannot ascertain it from the scan; believe me, hold this note up to your window or light in the ceiling of your room and you will see what I mean. Each and every letter of the watermark is plain, vivid and very, very easy to read. A classic illustration of the frustrating problem with a scanner and thick paper; as the watermark which is so vivid when holding the note, is simply not visible in the scan. A very pleasing example of the issue with no problems and only a slight tick of foxing just above Bennett's head when viewed from the front. It doesn't even go through to the back. To ad icing to the cake; this note also bears a very rare Nashville, TN broker's stamp. F.M. Morrow ran a brokerage firm in Nashville during the Civil War and locating one of his stamps is next to impossible. The stamp is clean, clear and vivid. It is contemporaneous with the note itself and dates to 1863 or so. An opportunity to own one of the toughest, most desirable watermarked notes there is, at a fraction of the cost of a Confederate Treasury note. Not sure why; as the note here offered is just as rare. The first I have seen in ages and a splendid piece that anyone would be proud to own.

PCGS

VF 30

 $750  

Reverse
Pic 2

   VA  $ 1

  State of Virginia

     CR 16 (1862)

    Richmond

Serial # 71648. Printed date of May 15, 1862 below right "1". A rather crude product of Hoyer & Ludwig that was issued by the thousands. Not a rare note. This one does have the lowest "ONE" red protector I can remember seeing; almost off the lower frame line. Part of a mounting remnant on the back. Otherwise, quite presentable.   VF+  $45  

Reverse

   VA  $ 1

  State of Virginia

     CR 17 (1862)

    Richmond

Serial # 61954. Printed date of July 21, 1862 below right "1". Due to the number of these low denomination notes which were printed; little, if any care was utilized in the trimming of them. This note is fully framed, although slightly uneven and bears exceptional color. Much more difficult to locate with color like this and problem free than one might think. Some minor handling and a small ding outside of the frame line. This note would be CU in most everyone's book.

CHOICE

     AU

 $75  

Reverse

    VA  $ 50

   Central Bank of

         Virginia

 

      BS 20-46

 

      Staunton

      April, 1860

 

 

  American Bank Note

         Company

Serial # 789. Dated April 4, 1860. Authorized by the Virginia legislature on March 26, 1851 in Augusta County. Bank title, upper left. Agriculture, Commerce and Justice seated to upper right. Portrait of lady in oval at lower left. Red "50" on dies, upper left and lower right. Large "50" and "L" red overprint. Plain back. A very pleasing example of this colorful American Bank Note Company product. Very well trimmed, bearing honest, even wear. No pinholes, chinks or tears with slight evidence of counting (somewhat darker area) to far right. The Fifty dollar denomination is the highest denomination printed by the Central Bank.

Choice

Fine

 

 

Mkt

Grade:

VF-30

 $180  

Reverse

    VA  $ 5

    Bank of the

Commonwealth

     170 G2a

 

   Richmond

   July 23, 1861

 

   Incredible Color

 

  American Bank

  Note Company

Serial # 4972. Dated July 23, 1861. Central vignette of two men negotiating over "hogsheads" of tobacco. George Washington in oval to lower left. Virginia State seal at lower right. Plain back. A stunning obsolete from the Great State of Virginia. By the time this note was issued; the Civil War had started. Incredible eye appeal and color. Some versions of this note were counter signed by the Treasurer although most were not. Considered by many obsolete experts to be one of the most beautiful notes ever printed. I can certainly understand that; as this issue has always been one of my favorites. One of roughly a twenty note run that surfaced some 25+ years ago and long since absorbed. No ink bleed or burn. This note has it all. Deep, original embossing jumps out of the note from the back; although is not seen in the scan. Amazing eye appeal, color, clarity and design. A truly beautiful obsolete bank note bearing, immaculate quality which will soon be totally unavailable at anywhere near the price listed here. Nearly every note in the 20 note run mentioned above saw the signature of the Cashier (at lower left) run straight across and block the American Bank Note Company imprint. Not so here. A true work of art.

  CHOICE

      CU

 $375

 

 

Reverse
Pic 2

   VA  $ 20

   Exchange Bank

     05-70-26

ABINGDON  BRANCH

         Rare  

        1859        

Serial # 3303. Brown ink date of April 9, 1859. While notes on the parent bank at Norfolk and the Lynchburg branch are common; not so with Abingdon. An extremely early settlement in Southwest Virginia; Abingdon was one of the first inland centers of trade in the Southern United States with ties directly to the port city of colonial Charleston, SC in the mid 1700's. A few scattered pinholes, but by far one of the best notes upon this rare branch bank I've seen. When found, usually in pieces. Superb color for the grade. Rare!   FINE  $375  

Reverse
Pic 2

   VA  $ 50    Monticello Bank

    BC-25-35

   Charlottesville

  September, 1860

 

 

 

 

  EXTREMELY

        RARE

  

Serial # 409. Dated September 6, 1860. Ornate red "FIFTY" to far left coupled with "L" overprinted in red as well. Liberty standing with shield to left of center. Thomas Jefferson's home, Monticello at lower right. American Bank Note Company Imprint. Plain back. I can think of no other bank from this era located in the State of Virginia which emitted notes which are remotely as sought after and desirable as the Monticello Bank. Incredibly rare and very seldom seen. Two serial numbers away from the #412 note plated in Jones and Littlefield's wonderful Virginia reference, "Virginia Obsolete Paper Money". Simply a superb note for the grade. Despite the circulation this note endured; it's color, signatures and date remain vivid and bright. This note is known as an "opportunity note" i.e., in the unlikely event an example appears, one had best acquire it. Superb trim and simply an amazing note for the grade. At this grade level, one would expect to see margin chinks, a stain or spot and a multitude of other issues. Not so here. There is a visible pinhole as seen from the back and a few other tiny, tiny "flicks" when candled which are indeed hard to see. Hardly what one would deem a problem with such a great rarity. This bank had an impeccable reputation and all of it's notes circulated heavily. Consequently; there are no known examples of this denomination above the grade of fine to very fine. In addition and further due to heavy use, most Monticello Bank notes are plagued with problems. Extremely rare, quality obsoletes such as this note are simply not to be found upon a whim in this day and time. Those who collect this bank know of what I speak. An opportunity to acquire a great Virginia rarity; and a high quality example at that.

CHOICE

  FINE

 SOLD

 

 

Reverse

  VA  $ 20    Monticello Bank

    BC-25-31

                         

    Charlottesville 

 

 

 

 

  October, 1860

 

 

 

 

   Clean & Bright

Serial # 4759. Dated October 9, 1860. Thick bank note paper. Very detailed vignette of Thomas Jefferson's home, "Monticello" to right. Portrait of young lady to left. "20" upon ornate die surrounded in red upper left. Milkmaid to lower left and Portrait of Thomas Jefferson within oval to lower right. Red "TWENTY" in small letters overprint. American Bank Note Company imprint just below signature for President at lower right. Plain back. An exceptionally clean and bright $20 note from this ever popular Virginia bank. One could look through hundreds of these notes and fail to locate an example this clean and free of soiling. No pinholes and immaculate eye appeal. The Bank of Monticello was a very reputable bank in it's day resulting in heavy use of it's issues. Consequently; locating an attractive example is much more difficult than most think. It seems there is always a problem somewhere when viewing one of these. Such is not the case with this piece. The light area seen at the upper right back is simply where the corner was folded over for many years. This is not the least bit uncommon when old, original groups of notes are located and have been stored or placed in a box for 160 years. Nice even wear and a beautiful, problem free piece. What I would give to see one of these in AU or better. None are known above the grade of VF and the note's true beauty is readily ascertained here. Extremely difficult this nice.

Choice Fine+

 

 

 

MKT

GRADE:

VF-30

 $275     

  SOLD

 

Reverse
Pic 2

    VA  $  8    Monticello Bank

    BC-25-21A

 

 

   Charlottesville

       April, 1861       

 

 

 

 

 

  Excessively Rare
Serial # 19. Dated April 29, 1861. According to Jones and Littlefield, central vignette of "Music", "Poetry", and "Painting". Large "8" on die to upper right. Farmer seated to lower left. Virginia State Arms to lower right. Red "EIGHT" overprint. Two digit serial number of 19. Plain back. While all of the odd denomination notes of the Bank of Monticello are extremely rare; the $8 note is tougher than the $6 or $7 issues. Sort of like saying hitting the lottery is rare; however hitting it four times in a row is more rare! Nonetheless, this is true. The first $8 Bank of Monticello I have ever had the pleasure of offering in over 4 decades in this business. Even though the note has sustained some corner damage as a result of what appears to be a careless dismounting from an album (likely long ago); it remains very desirable and highly collectible. Understandably, beginning collectors or those unfamiliar with the Bank of Monticello notes will not understand why the note is so desirable and costs what it does ( I know I would not have long ago). A classic scenario wherein collectors of this bank do not know when or if another example will appear. This note could have been sent to a professional restoration person; although such is not my way of doing things. The note looks much, much worse in the scan than in person and is actually very, very pleasing to the eye. Were it not for the corner damage; this note would no doubt be the finest known. No pinholes, superb clarity and contrast with a strong overprint. The advanced collector knows how rare this piece is and that it remains highly desirable and collectible, despite the aforementioned problems. Rarity beyond description and a true prize. Opportunity is the key word here.

F++/VF

Net

 

 

 

MKT

GRADE:

Apparent

VF-30-35

  SOLD  

Reverse

    VA  $  7    Monticello Bank

    BC-25-19A

 

   Charlottesville

        July, 1861       

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

  Excessively Rare

Serial # 68. Dated July 1, 1861. "7" on ornate dies, left and right top. Black and white horse with train in distance; center. Virginia State Arms to lower right. Red "SEVEN" overprint. Two digit serial number. Simply an amazingly well preserved and problem free example of this excessively rare obsolete bank note. While the term "rare" is frequently used when discussing obsoletes and rightfully so; the term takes upon a whole new meaning with regard to this note. In over 4 decades, I have seen one better and perhaps two or three that were much, much worse. Slight ink feathering at the signature for President to the right. Perhaps the President was distracted and held his quill pen down for a second too long. However, this occasioned no ink burn or bleed. Even if it did; it would not affect the desirability of this wonderful note. One must remember that the odd denomination notes from the Bank of Monticello are most always plagued with major problems....on the rare occasion one is seen. As stated above; when found, these notes are most always severely impaired. Not so with this example. A tiny, tiny pinhole or speck of ink bleed may be seen upon careful examination of the continuation of the Cashier's signature from the note above when viewing the right back. Hardly a problem relative to this issue. Fully framed, bearing a very strong red overprint with superb eye appeal. A magnificent Bank of Monticello $7 odd denomination note. I have serious reservations that one could locate a nicer example; provided another example be located at all.  CHOICE

   FINE

 

 

MKT

Grade

 VF-30

  SOLD

 

Reverse

    VA  $  6    Monticello Bank

    BC-25-17A

 

   Charlottesville

        July, 1861       

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

  Excessively Rare

 

Serial # 58. Dated July 1, 1861. Central vignette of two gentlemen with hogshead of tobacco. Maiden strewing flowers to upper left. "6" on dies; lower left and upper right. Virginia State Arms to lower right. Red "SIX" overprint. Plain back. The odd denomination notes of the Bank of Monticello are justifiably considered to be great rarities in the obsolete note collecting world. Upon the very rare occasion one is seen, competition to acquire it is great. In the 44 years I have been involved in obsolete paper money, I can recall seeing only a few of the $6, $7, $8 or $9 denominations (combined). Of those; all but one or two were severely impaired. If one collects the Bank of Monticello; the old adage heard in the obsolete world of "You grade the second one" most definitely applies. Demand and prices realized are not affected by missing corners or pieces, severe stains, heavy soiling, tears and the like; as one might expect with most obsolete notes. Known as "opportunity" notes; due to the fact that odd denomination notes appear very, very rarely. The appearance of a $50 or $100 note from this bank is quite an event; much less an odd denomination note. The note bears vivid and correct signatures, bold  two digit serial number and is quite wholesome. Save for a minor corner loss, outside the frame line, a small rust spot to the upper right from the back and a small, non distracting spot at the "LL" of "Monticello", this piece is immaculate. These are very minor problems relative to this issue. In March 2017, I witnessed a $6 Bank of Monticello just like this one sell at auction in New York City. That note had a very dark stain which ran from the maiden's right arm on the left all the way across and below the bank title to the upper right "6". Price realized: over $3,700. The note here offered is far superior to that note and the best $6 Bank of Monticello I have encountered. Those who are familiar with the rarity and condition these notes are found in; when seen, will know of what I speak. An extremely rare opportunity to add one of the most desirable obsoletes extant and a true great rarity to your collection.

F+/VF

Net

 

 

 

 

 

MKT

GRADE:

 

Apparent

 VF-30

 SOLD  

Reverse

   VA  $ 5    Monticello Bank

    BC-25-14

 

   Charlottesville

 

  November, 1860

 

 

 

 

 

 

      High Grade

   Incredible Color

Serial # 2031. Dated November 10, 1860. Central vignette of Thomas Jefferson's home, Monticello. Portrait of Florence Nightingale to upper right. Thomas Jefferson within oval to lower left. Ornate "5" on black and red dies; right and left. Milk maid with cows to lower right. Plain back. A breathtaking example of this amazing American Bank Note Company product. Bright, fresh and as crisp as the day it was printed over 155 years ago. No pinholes or other problems. Non distracting light folds are noted at the upper left and right from the back; although hard to see when viewing the note in person. Not an excessively rare note in grades of fine or so; however, extremely rare in this state of preservation. There have been no "groups" or "hoards" of these discovered and locating an example of this lofty caliber is merely an act of happenstance. For some reason, this note was put back by someone and not used. Without reservation the best I have ever encountered. Good trim, although cut just a tiny fraction tight at the lower right from the front. I have included a scan of the note against a white background in "Pic 2" in order to better illustrate just how minimal this is. Believe me; the stunning color and overall condition of this incredible note more than compensate for the very small area of tightness in trim. An extremely popular and heavily collected bank. Herein lies the opportunity to acquire one of the most beautiful examples one will likely ever encounter upon the Bank of Monticello. Eye appeal beyond description.  AU

  SOLD

 

Reverse
Pic 2

  VA  $ 20

   City of Petersburg

  

      BP 25-30

 

       July 1, 1861

 

 

 

 

 

  Multi Color-Scarce

Serial # 464. Dated July 1, 1861. Vignette of two horses at upper left. George Washington in Oval to mid right. Indian maiden standing; lower right corner. "20" on red die upper right and lower left, with large green "20" overprint. Plain back. One of the very few multicolored obsoletes bank notes printed. The Bank of the City of Petersburg opened in late 1860. Located in Dinwiddie County on the Appomattox River, the city played a strategic role in the Civil War and was the sight of many large engagements. Notes form this bank are most always found punch cancelled. Slight foxing; which seems to be present on most all Bank of the City of Petersburg notes I have ever seen. Perhaps due to the multi-colored print; although I am unsure. Nonetheless, most seen are so encountered. As stated in the leading Virginia obsolete note reference by Jones and Littlefield, "Notes on this bank are almost always found either cut cancelled or punched out cancelled". It has been my experience that punch out cancelled is the norm. A rare note and rated 5F by Littlefield and Jones. This translates into 10-24 known in any grade. Whatever the case may be; a scarce piece of history, an amazingly beautiful note and extremely rare. The note you see here is just about as nice as these come.  FINE

POC

 

 

 

 

Mkt

Grade:

VF-25

 $475  

Reverse

   VA  $ 10

   City of Petersburg

  

      BP 25-20

 

       July 1, 1861

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Multicolored

 

 American Bank Note

        Company

Serial # 764. Dated July 1, 1861. Man seated next to "hogshead" of tobacco left center. Female with child to right center. Large "10" green overprint at bank title. "10" in red dies at upper left, right and lower right. Red "X" and "TEN". Simply a breathtaking note and one which likely cost a small fortune to have printed in 1860. Red ink was very expensive; much less green. Without reservation, one of best Bank of the City of Petersburg notes I have ever seen. These simply do not exist in high grade and as stated above; are nearly always seen punch cancelled. In 45 years, I have seen one note from this bank which was not punch cancelled. Incredible color and eye appeal. No problems whatsoever. Jones & Littlefield estimate 25-49 notes known, in all grades. Long ago, a collector placed some thin paper over the poc's from the back. This was not done to hide the poc's or deceive. It is hard to believe; however, these notes cost all of 25-30 cents many, many years ago. Collectors thought nothing of doing something like this and it in no way diminishes the value of this rare note. High quality paper and simply drop dead eye appeal. Notes from this bank are very scarce and are excessively rare in this state of preservation; as the few which are seen are found stained, torn, faded or the like. A beautiful obsolete if there ever was one.

CHOICE

  FINE+

POC

 

 

 

Mkt

Grade:

 

VF-30

 $395  

Reverse

  VA  $ 5

   City of Petersburg

  

      BP 25-15

 

       May 1, 1861

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Multicolored

 

 American Bank Note

        Company

Serial # 727. Dated May 1, 1861. Central vignette of female seated within large, ornate, red "V". Black man with cows to lower left. Portrait of two children to far right. Green "5" left and right of central vignette. Red "V" and red dies. Plain back. Incredible color and eye appeal. Although punch out cancelled; as 99.99% of these are, the note retains breathtaking eye appeal. Free of the normal stains, tears and the like. Advanced collectors are aware that issues from this bank simply are not available non punched. However; I well recall the days when I first started and telling myself I would "wait on one that wasn't". As stated above; I have seen one single City of Petersburg note in 45 years that was not poc. Choice trim, bright and crisp. Unless one has seen a fair number of these; it is near impossible to understand just how amazing this note is. It is truly hard to believe that this note retains the vivid, stunning color after all of these years.

CHOICE

  FINE

POC

 

 

 

Mkt

Grade:

VF-30

 $375  

Reverse

   VA  $ 10

  Bank of Philippi     

       

     BP40-22               

   165-G12a         

       

 

     Philippi, VA            

  (Now West VA)    

 

 

 

  PCGS Very Fine 35

 

 

 

 

 

    May 6, 1861         

Serial # 781. Dated May 6, 1861. Central vignette of farmer and Indian seated between framed river scene. Ornate green "10" on die to upper left. Portrait of lady to lower left. "TEN" within green panel to far right. Very small green "TEN" anti counterfeiting measures placed across the note from the bank title all the way to the bottom. Plain back. A very appealing and most interesting obsolete bank note hailing from Philippi, Virginia. Volumes could be written about this note; as it hails from a portion of Virginia that was against secession and which actually seceded from the State of Virginia during the Civil War. Philippi became part of West Virginia during the Civil War when that State was admitted to the Union on June 20, 1863. The county seat of Barbour County, West Virginia. The 2010 census listed Philippi as having a population of 2,996. In 1861, the population was between 350-390 residents. A gorgeous note and rarely located without serious problems. Bright, fresh and clean bearing superb eye appeal. The best Eric Newman could come up with at a time when obsolete bank notes were there "for the picking". A truly interesting note which merits much further discussion than space permits here.

PCGS Very Fine

       35

 $375  

Reverse

  VA  $ 5

   Bank of Roanoke

 

    210 G2a

   BS 10-05

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Salem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Extremely Rare

No serial number. Reconstructed note. Central vignette of five females seated behind large numerical "5" and "Five Dollars". Male portrait at lower left. State arms, bottom right corner. While chartered by the Virginia General Assembly on March 2, 1853, the bank never opened. Consequently, only a few sheets of notes were ordered and these were not used. The very few sheets of Bank of Roanoke notes extant were utilized to print City of Richmond notes upon. This particular note is comprised of two 75 cent and one 60 cent City of Richmond notes. Any City of Richmond note printed upon the back of a Bank of Roanoke note is scarce. Haxby and Virginia obsolete authors Jones and Littlefield attest to the fact that the only known notes upon this bank are reconstructed from City of Richmond notes. "Notes were not legally issued. Complete notes are not known". Reconstructed $5 notes are pictured in each reference book. Even the ancient prices listed in Haxby place this reconstructed note at $60 in very fine. This is not a note which may be easily reconstructed and was done long ago; when such a feat would have been possible. If these notes were easily reconstructed, we would see many more of them today. Haxby realized this. Many dealers and collectors currently use a multiplier of 10 when valuing a note listed in Haxby for today's market. I have found this to be accurate over 90% of the time; dependant upon the rarity of the piece. Irregardless; an opportunity to acquire a true Virginia rarity. This is the only Bank of Roanoke note I have ever had the pleasure of offering. A very presentable piece which looks much better in person than in the scan. Excessively rare.

Fine

 

 

Reconstructed.

Only manner

found

 $375  

Reverse

  VA  $ 1

Traders Bank City of

      Richmond   

            

     BR 110-05

 

 

 

 

"Childrey The Druggist

 Buying Coins, Stamps

       & Relcs"

Serial # 2582. Dated September 6, 1861. Moneta (CSA T-10) to lower left and "Sailor at Capstan" (CSA T-18) to right. No ink bleed, pinholes or other problems and very nice for this low denomination issue. Most $1 Traders Bank issues are found tattered, torn, and in simply terrible condition. By no means a rare Hoyer & Ludwig product, the back displays an ad of 'Childrey the Druggist", one of the most prolific users of Confederate and obsolete bank notes for advertising purposes. Advertisements placed upon original obsolete and Confederate bank notes were a most effective means of advertising shortly after the Civil War. The practice of utilizing original notes continued until around 1880-1890 at which time the supply of such notes had dwindled to the point of near non availability After this time, we see the printed "facsimile" ad note appear upon the scene. Even though Childrey was located in Richmond, very few Traders Bank issues have been encountered bearing his ad. An extremely interesting and intriguing piece of Americana. Very Fine  $160  

Reverse


 

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