Inventory - Miscellaneous Obsoletes and Southern States - Georgia:
 

Below are my current offerings in Georgia. Visit the Terms page to order.


 

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Abbreviation Key


      All notes in stock unless otherwise indicated. Hundreds more notes from all Southern States to be added as time permits. If you don't see it; please feel free to ask. Odds are I have it. 99% of my inventory is NOT listed on the Web Site.    

Once a scan comes up; click the center square for a larger image.

 GA                       Georgia
    GA  $ 100

State of Georgia

     CR 1

  Milledgeville 1862

Serial # 4008. Somewhat toned; as nearly all CR 1's are. Minor handling, as the 1862 high denomination issues always show more counting than do later issues. Well trimmed and a very appealing note.     CU  $145  

Reverse

    GA  $ 100

State of Georgia

      UNL

 

 

 

Excessively Rare

 

 Contemporary

Counterfeit of CR 1

Serial # 8827. Extremely rare. Lithographed upon period paper. No red protector; rather a light black, patterned image. High denomination State contemporary counterfeits are excessively rare to nonexistent. In fact, I know of no other Southern State in which this was attempted relative to an official State produced note during the Civil War. The signatures and serial number are printed; not hand written in brown ink. P. (Peterson) Thweatt's name appears as the Comptroller General and Jno (John) Jones as the Treasurer of the State of Georgia. For those of you fortunate enough to have the 2005 book, "State of Georgia, Treasury Notes, Certificates and Bonds" by W. Mack Martin and Kenneth S. Latimer; this piece is depicted on page 15 of that outstanding work. That piece also bears printed serial number 8827, Plate "A" and is likely the same note. I have not had the opportunity to inquire of Mac. The same note or not, the fact that the two notes are identical in all respects would imply multiple attempts at counterfeiting this issue simply were not made. Attempting to pass a large denomination note in 1862 was risky business; especially a State issued counterfeit. The note shows no real signs of actual circulation. A most insignificant light water spot or two on the back along with some minor handling. Relative to a piece such as this one; it would make little difference if it graded very good. Further, the note offered here is the one and only contemporary counterfeit of a Southern State issue I have ever seen. It would stick out today much akin to the proverbial "sore thumb" and one or more would have shown themselves by now had more of them been produced. It is much more crude than the genuine and most likely would not have passed, even in 1862. Most high denomination notes were not used by the general public this early in the Civil War. Those entities which did handle $100 issues hired qualified personnel who were trained to detect this very thing. In all probability, the counterfeiters realized the mistake they had made very early after finishing and stopped before they were caught and hung. Thus the great rarity of this note. A true Southern State rarity and absolutely guaranteed to be a contemporary Civil War piece. Simply incredible and totally irreplaceable.   XF++  $1275  

Reverse

    GA  $ 5

State of Georgia

     CR 5

  Milledgeville 1862

Serial # 36780. Central portrait of James Oglethorpe. Red protector below. Plain back. Not rare; although this note is as snow white and splendid as they come. No issues whatsoever and perfectly trimmed.

CHOICE

    CU

 $ 75  

Reverse

    GA  $ 5

State of Georgia

     CR 5A

  Milledgeville 1862

Serial # 187149. Same as above; although red protector is inverted (into portrait of Ogelthorpe). Snow white. Scan is so detailed, paper imperfections appear that normally could not be seen. Such an anomaly exists at the upper left reverse in the form of a small sheet crimp. A beauty. GEM CU  $175  

Reverse

   GA  $100

State of Georgia

     CR 6

  Milledgeville 1863

Serial # 13407. Portrait of Georgia Governor Joseph E. Brown to left. Rattlesnake coiled around Georgia coat of arms in center. One Treasury stamp on back; otherwise blank. Printed date of February 1st, 1863. Nice, bright white note bearing a pencil written price tag of .30 or 30 cents. Crackling crisp and as fresh as new. Well trimmed, although just a tick tight at the upper left. What appears to be a fold at the right back is only minor handling. You can't even see it in person. A nice CR-6.    CU  $125  

Reverse

   GA  $100

State of Georgia

     CR 6

  Milledgeville 1863

Serial # 6116. Only 2 serial numbers away from the note plated in Hugh Shull's Southern States book. In fact; this note came from a collection which Hugh helped a collector build some time ago. A peach. CH CU  $135  

Reverse

   GA  $100

State of Georgia

     CR 6B/D ??

  Milledgeville 1863

Serial # 4781. Same as CR 6; although the black, Georgia Treasury seal is missing from the back. In addition, the red protector is inverted, covering the lower portion of the note as in a CR 6D. I cannot recall seeing a double error note such as this one. Very light "bend" is visible in the scan at the upper left reverse. It cannot be seen while looking at the note in person. The note is snow white; although the scan gives it a toned or dark look. It isn't. Rare!   CU  $395  

Reverse

   GA  $ 50

State of Georgia

     CR 7

  Milledgeville 1863

Serial # 18425. Printed date of February 2d, 1863. Central vignette of rattlesnake coiled around "L". To left, Georgia coat of arms with cotton plant at top and wheat at bottom. "FIFTY" to right. Blank back, save for black Treasury seal. A lovely note with a very readable Treasury seal on the back. Crisp, bright and like new.   CU  $ 85  

Reverse

   GA  75 Cents

State of Georgia

     CR 13

  Milledgeville 1863

Serial # 4304. A very tough Georgia note. Extremely rare in high grade and a downright tough note in any grade. Were this note an UNC; we would be looking at well over $1,000. CH CU; who knows....as I don't think an example exits. These circulated very heavily and most are unrecognizable. Tattered, torn and half notes are the norm. In reality, a very nice example.    VG  $375  

Reverse

   GA  25 Cents

State of Georgia

     CR 15?

  Milledgeville 1863

Bogus Signers

 

MANUSCRIPT

  "SPURIOUS"

Serial # 85. A genuine Cr 15 which was stolen and issued by totally bogus signers. No seal exists. Crisp, although likely mishandled in the last 150 years. In contemporary brown ink; the note is marked "Spurious". It doesn't come any better than that. Not to be confused with a contemporary counterfeit; as this is a genuine note which fell into the hands of "less than moral" people in 1863. The note was unsigned when they acquired it. It was then signed, passed or attempted to be passed and caught the eye of some sharp eyed official. There were no such authorized signers as appear on this note. Unissued CR 15's can be found today. What makes this one very special is that it was fraudulently issued in 1863 by bogus signers and recognized! Guaranteed to be the real thing and a "Spurious" note issued during the Civil War. Incredible. Excessively Rare  VF+/XF                  $450

 

 

Reverse

    GA  20 Cents

State of Georgia

     CR 16

  Milledgeville 1863

   Scarce Note

Serial # 9851. The ever elusive change note from the Georgia State series. Most are counterfeit. This one is guaranteed to be the genuine issue. Very scarce in high grade. In Hugh Shull's Guide Book of Southern States Currency; this note lists at $450 in UNC.. Not choice CU, but uncirculated. This note has Hugh's old sticker on it and was graded "UNC" by him. I agree, although there does exist an old mount on the right side from the back. Still; an attractive and exceptional example of this very tough issue.  UNC-  $275  

Reverse

   GA  15 Cents

State of Georgia

     CR 17

  Milledgeville 1863

Serial # 2648. A snow white, perfectly framed example of this odd denomination piece. What appears as a fold on the upper right reverse is a very light sheet crimp and as made. These do no harm to any note.   CU  $95  

Reverse

   GA  $ 4

State of Georgia

      Cr 27

  Milledgeville 1864

Serial # 4602. Printed date of January 1st, 1864. Center: Moneta seated by chest. Slave carrying cotton to left and field hand holding grain with horse and dog to right. A most pleasing example of this "change note" issued in 1864. Odd denomination notes such as this one are by no means common. Quite the contrary. One very light fold at the upper left back. Tough this nice; as these notes were used....a lot.

CHOICE

    AU++

 $295  
Reverse
   GA  $ 3

State of Georgia

      Cr 28

  Milledgeville 1864

     Scarce

Serial # 22940. A superb example of this very scarce Georgia change bill. Crackling crisp and as fresh as the day it was printed. Not one single pinhole or other problem. Notes like this only appear when older collections are sold.

 Superb.

 UNC.  $350  

Reverse

   GA 50 Cents

     State of Georgia                      

            Cr 31   

  Milledgeville 1864

    Extremely Rare

Serial # 1946. A choice example of this R-9 1864 Georgia fractional. Shull lists estimated survivors in any grade at R-9 to be 15-50! Considering the use these notes saw; the piece here offered is truly amazing. A Gem in all respects. Bright white, totally problem free and from the collection above referenced which Hugh helped a client put together some years ago. In fact, only three serial numbers away from the note plated in Hugh's Southern States book. If you want the best CR 31 available...here it is.  GEM  CU       $350  

Reverse

   GA  $ 50

      State of Georgia              

           Cr 32      

  Milledgeville 1865

Serial # 2886. An incredible example of this 1865 $50 issue. Perfect trim and problem free. What you see at the upper left reverse is a small sheet crimp and not a fold. The best embossing I've ever seen on a State of Georgia note. Red protector shifted to left. Simply am amazing note and sure to please the most discriminating collector.  GEM CU       $225  

Reverse

   GA  $ 10

      State of Georgia                

           Cr 33       

  Milledgeville 1865

Serial # 4067. Locomotive rounding curve to left, Georgia coat of arms in oval at center. Plain back, save for one Treasury seal. Printed date of March 20th, 1865. 7,000 notes printed; not all issued. Obviously, optimism permeated Georgians in 1865, as this note is payable in Confederate notes. It was issued as Sherman was already in Georgia on his march to the sea. Sherman entered Georgia in late 1864. Very few Southern notes will be encountered bearing this late date and also payable in CSA notes! Simply a neat piece of history. A bump at the lower left front and one fold. A solid piece of American history at a very affordable price.   AU  $ 85  

Reverse

    GA  $10

      State of Georgia                

      Cr 33B

  Milledgeville 1865

 

 

 

Very Scarce Variety

Serial # 3661. Dated March 20, 1865. A mere 7,000 Ten Dollar notes printed; which were not all issued. Same vignettes as above. An "n" appears just before the "on the 25th" which is not supposed to be present. (see pic 2). A very bight note; although the scan provides a dark, mottled look to the note. It does not appear this dark in person. By the time this note was printed, Sherman had begun his march to the sea and was actually in Georgia. Consequently; the enabling legislation for this issue (along with the 1865 $100, $50 and $5 notes) was passed at Macon, as the Georgia State capitol was moved from Milledgeville to that location. A seldom seen variety and a tough one. With only 7,000 notes of all types printed bearing the date of 1865, one can readily deduce why. No pinholes or other problems and as crisp and fresh as new. A gem note, save for the very slightest of fraction tight trim at the mid left top. The frame line is present. A superb Southern States note and an extremely difficult piece to find. The seven years which have passed since Hugh did his book on Southern States currency are akin to light years, price wise.  CU

Near Gem

 $325  

Reverse
Pic 2

*** In early 2016, Whitman Publishing Company released Volume 6 of it's series relative to obsolete paper money entitled "Whitman Encyclopedia of Obsolete Paper Money - Volume 6, South Atlantic Part I - Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina - Q. David Bowers with Foreword by Mack Martin". A much needed reference for collectors of these wonderful pieces of history and works of art. While I do not have space here, please see my observations under "Recent Additions and News". I highly recommend this series to all collectors of obsolete bank notes.
   GA   25 Cents

       Ocmulgee & Flint               

      River Rail Road Co          

             UNL      

 

       July 19, 1841       

 

     ALBANY

Serial # 450. Dated July 19, 1841. Small, central vignette of the very first type of steam powered train developed in the U.S.. An incredible miracle of survival and a true piece of Americana. The odds of a piece like this surviving nearly 175 years are astronomically low. There was no reason for it to be saved; it was not a "curio" as were Confederate notes and it's survival was by mere happenstance. Incredibly well preserved, with only the tiniest bit of insignificant rust on the back. Amazing. The tan areas seen at the signatures, date and serial number seem to have been placed there contemporaneously with the signing, numbering and dating of the note. I have studied it very closely and can assure you that these areas are not modern. It seems as though someone "smudged" a lighter color ink in these "box" like areas so that the signature, date and serial number would show up better and hold up longer. It was done long ago and appears to have worked as well. A gorgeous piece and simply amazing that such a small piece of paper which still survives today can tell us so much. American history at it's best.

CHOICE

   FINE

 

MKT:

VF+

 $395  

Reverse

   GA  $ 1

       Warehouse, Ins &          

      Deposit Company

        UNL

 

       AMERICUS, GA       

Serial # either faded or not numbered. An extremely scarce piece of Southern post war scrip. Very rarely seen and if so; only in very advanced collections. I have had the occasion to observe one other piece from Americus and that one had the date of 1870 marked out and the date of 1865 written over the top in brown ink. Any Southern reconstruction piece is rare; much less a piece from the very small locality of Americus. Surprisingly solid for it's appearance, with not one pinhole, tear or problem. Very bright color. This piece exhibits all of the characteristics of actual circulation; not that of a remainder. Given the size of Americus, it is quite possible that this note was used without being signed. A most interesting imprint of "Burke & Co Printers, Macon, GA. I honestly do not know where one could ever find another.  FINE  $425  

Reverse

   GA  $ 2

       Bank of Athens

 

           5 - G4b

 

     Athens  1859

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 CSA T-23 "Wagon Load       

     of Cotton" vignette      

Serial # 3692. Dated July 18, 1859. Famous central vignette as seen upon the Confederate T-23, "Waggon Load of Cotton". White "2" on dies, left and right. Portrait of Thomas Jefferson in oval to lower right. Woman with sickle to lower left. Red-orange lathe work with Large white "TWO". Plain back. The American Bank Note Company monogram may be seen to the left of the right "2". Given the low denomination of the issue; a more than presentable example. Eye appeal that greatly exceeds the grade. Bowers estimates 17 to 32 survivors in all grades; which would include torn, completely soiled and all otherwise impaired notes. This seems optimistic, although within the realm of reason. During this time, low denomination notes such as $1 and $2 issues circulated heavily and Bank of Athens issues were certainly no exception. Unless you have seen a few of these; it is hard to grasp just how nice this example is. Incredibly clean and intact for an issue most often seen heavily impaired. Some top edge roughness, a few pinholes and one tiny, tiny spot of ink bleed (the size of a sharp end of a pin). No tears, on the margins or internally. A tougher and very desirable Southern obsolete and about as nice as these come. I have never seen this issue above the grade of fine, upon the very scarce occasion I do see one. I may be grading this example too conservatively; although I prefer the note be under graded than over graded. The CSA T-23 vignette most definitely adds to the notes appeal. A note which possesses the eye appeal and appearance of a much higher grade. VG+/F  $285  

Reverse

     GA  $   1

             B. Blair                         

         

             Unlisted                     

 

      Atlanta - January 1, 1863   

 

 

         

 

          PCGS Fine 12             

 

 

          PAY CSA $$$

Serial # 123. Dated January 1, 1863. A most unusual and perhaps unique piece. This small note states "Will pay to bearer, at the Treasury in Atlanta...etc". The interesting aspect of this statement is that the Georgia State Treasury was located in Milledgeville, GA at this time. The first such piece I have seen signed by B. Blair. No pinholes and very presentable. I suspect the note is either spurious or more research is needed relative to an "Atlanta"" branch of the Georgia State Treasury. As stated, very well unique signed by Blair. Whatever the case may be, an excessively rare and intriguing piece; begging for more research and a note which would make a great addition to any obsolete note collection. Perfect for  those who like the odd and curious. PCGS FINE 12       $575  

Reverse

     GA  $   2

         Bank of Fulton                   

            25-G-4a

 

   Atlanta - January 1, 1857

 

 

 

 

     PCGS Very Fine 25                     

 

 

 

    Tough Non Impaired               

Serial # 7927. Dated January 1, 1857. Central vignette of two men discussing hogshead of tobacco and being the same central vignette as that used upon the $5 Virginia Bank of the Commonwealth note. "2" on die, upper left and right. Locomotive within oval to lower right. Woman to lower left. Red "2" right and left. Plain back. An extremely difficult low denomination to locate in collectable grade. Nearly always impaired in some manner and much, much more difficult to locate problem free than most think. Newman knew this during the time he assembled his superb collection; when such material was much more available than it is today and this was the best he could do. Well inked, not one pinhole and a gorgeous note for the issue. The $2 issue circulated heavily thereby creating the rarity of collectible examples today.

PCGS Very Fine              25                                

 $375  

Reverse
Pic 2

    GA  $  5

      Mechanics Savings Bank 

                   M-501                        

 

              Atlanta 1863          

 

 

 

 

 

        Choice  Advertising Note 

       Superb color, high           

               Grade                                                    

 

 

 

 

 

         Pay CSA Notes (?)                                                               

 

 

No serial #. Printed date of July 6, 1863. Ceres seated upon wheat holding small sickle. Locomotive in the distance behind her. Indian maiden standing to lower right. Ornate "FIVE", "V", "FIVE" on dies to far left. Blood red "V" and "FIVE" overprint. Plain back. A gorgeous example of this 1863, Civil War issued note in it's own right; irrespective of the amazing ad on the back. Fully framed and crackling crisp. No folds or problems of any kind. Breathtaking eye appeal. Upon the back we see the advertisement of General RR and Steamship Co. The ticket agent for the company in Atlanta was R.D. Mann. While we see R.D. Mann's name on some of these advertising notes; it is readily apparent that the ad upon this note was freshly inked. The red ink is extremely vivid and strong. A puzzling aspect of this note is seen at the very bottom of the ad (pic 2). The note is redeemable in Confederate Treasury Notes when presented in sums of $50 or more. It has long been believed that the first use of contemporary obsolete or CSA notes for advertising purposes was around 1876. Could it be that this note was used for advertising purposes before the war ended? Unless the company was offering Confederate Treasury notes as "curios" after the war, I cannot explain the inclusion of this clause. Irregardless, the best I have seen and a true piece of American Civil War history. If you seek quality and intrigue, you can't go wrong with this breathtaking piece.

CHOICE

UNCIRCULATED

 $275  

Reverse
Pic 2

   GA  $50

       Augusta Insurance

     & Banking Company   

           35- G48a         

         Augusta 1860         

    Tougher High                   

    Denomination               

Serial # 313. Machine stamped serial numbers. Above average color for this American Bank note Company product. Very tough to locate this nice. The areas at the bottom reverse that look "funny" are the result of the pen stroke continuation of the Cashier to the left front. There are no repairs and the note is completely original. A very colorful and desirable obsolete....especailly this high denomination.  Fine+  $195  

Reverse

   GA

 

 

 

 

 $  5

       Augusta Insurance

     & Banking Company                   

              35-G24a            

 

           Augusta 1860      

Serial # 1321. An amazing feat of engraving and printing by the American Bank Note Company of New York. While not rare; this note could best be described as a "common note in uncommon condition". Incredible color. No ink bleed or burn and totally problem free. Some minor handling at the left back. A tiny corner fold at the lower right back is all that keeps this note from a higher grade. Loads of original embossing that does not show up in the scan. As stated, a relatively easy to find note; although extremely rare in this grade. An amazing note. I am honestly concerned that the art of engraving displayed upon this note has been lost.

CHOICE

    AU+

 $435  

Reverse
Pic 2

  GA  $ 2

      Augusta Insurance               

     & Banking Company

         35-G 12a Proof

       Augusta 1860      

 

 

      STUNNING COLOR      

 

 

 

       PCGS GEM NEW            

                  65 

 

 

 

             PROOF            

No serial number. Proof. Central vignette of man watching carpenters at work. Young woman in oval to lower left. Justice and Georgia State Seal to lower right. "2" on dies with red protectors, left and right top. Large "TWO" red overprint. Bank title in red. Plain back. Hole out cancelled, as all proofs are. Very cleanly and sharply I might add. Many times; the HOC's become irregularly shaped or even torn. Not so with this immaculate piece. One of the most stunning color obsolete proofs in existence. Even though this note did not circulate it is truly hard to believe that such an incredible work of art has survived in such an immaculate state of preservation; escaping moisture, bending, soiling and all manner of potentially damaging scenarios for over 155 years. I need not go on about this note; as one can readily ascertain why it is so desirable. It's beauty and appeal is obvious. While circulating notes from this institution are rather common in mid grade; the same cannot be said for proofs. If a more stunning color obsolete proof exists; I have not seen it. An truly amazing work of art and worthy of any museum or the very finest of collections. Extraordinary.

PCGS GEM

NEW 65 PPQ

 

Premium

Paper

Quality

 

My Grade:

Gem CU

 $3995  

Reverse

   GA  $ 1

     Augusta Insurance                   & Banking Company

          35-G-6A

       Augusta  1861

Serial # 268. Dated March 4, 1861. Simply an incredible example of the engravers art. Bold, bright, vivid color as if the day it was printed. From the same collection as the $5 note listed above. Quite obviously, the previous collector choose from the best. As crisp as the day it was printed. Readily apparent is the fact that this note has not been exposed to any light in the last 150 years or so. Otherwise; the color could not possibly be this vivid. Superb. VF/XF  $155  

Reverse

   GA  $  5

        The City Bank    

 

           50-G-6a    

 

 

 

 

         PROOF                     

 

 

         Augusta                      

 

 

 

 

     PCGS GEM NEW                

            65 PPQ                     

No serial number; proof. Proof mounted on card stock. Punch out cancelled, as all contemporary proofs are. Central vignette of building with man on horseback passing by. "FIVE" at each corner. Two "5" protectors on dies at right and left. Red "Property of American Bank Note CO." stamp on back. While the PCGS holder indicates that this was an American Bank Note Company proof, such is not the case. This proof was the product of Bald, Cousland & Co of Philadelphia or Baldwin, Adams & Co. of New York as is indicated by the imprint upon the note. It is true that the American Bank Note Company later acquired the assets of the above firms and this proof became their property; this piece was not produced by them. Irregardless, a most attractive proof bearing quite intricate geometric designs. Bright white and superb. This is where the grading services loose me at Proof 65, 66, or 67. The proof here offered bears superb, even trim and carries no defects whatsoever. A gorgeous note; although not as rare as the tinted City Bank proofs offered below.

PCGS GEM NEW

     65 PPQ

 

Premium

Paper

Quality

 $525  

Reverse

  GA  $ 20

   The City Bank

 

      50-G-10c

 

 

     PROOF

 

 

     Augusta

 

 PCGS GEM NEW

      65 PPQ

No serial number; proof. Red-orange tint. Central vignette of young men with cart full of hay pulled by Oxen. Hounds within small oval to mid right. Splendid orange/brown tint. Plain back. Hole punch cancelled, as all proofs are. Printed upon very thin, onion skin like paper. Not mounted on card stock; which makes no difference either way. A gem example of this pre-American Bank note company archives sale note. Between September 13, 1990 and June 5, 1991; Christies of New York held various, now famous sales of the American Bank Note Company archives. While proof obsoletes were somewhat available prior to the series of sales held by Christies; they were indeed tougher to find. The Christies sales by no means "flooded" the market with proof obsoletes; however, did serve to make some more available to collectors which were not available before. A magnificent proof and a true work of art. I find it baffling that one may acquire a 160 year old piece such as this for the same or lower price a common Federal note printed by the thousands will bring today. This scenario is rapidly changing.

PCGS GEM NEW

         65 PPQ

 

Premium

Paper

Quality

 $795  

Reverse

   GA  $ 50

   The City Bank

 

    50-G-12c

 

     PROOF

 

     Augusta

 

 

 

  SENC/HAXBY                 

 

      GEM                               

No serial number, proof. Another pre-American Bank Note Company archives sale piece. Red-orange tint. A simply breathtaking example of this extremely rare proof which is listed as SENC (Surviving Example Not Confirmed) in Haxby. Gorgeous vignette of Eagle atop shield to lower right. Dog in small oval at mid left. Excessively rare. Gem in all respects and totally problem free. The dark area seen at the far top right corner is actually contemporary ink made during the printing process and does nothing to affect the grade of this wonderful piece. Ungraded by a third party grading service; I can assure you that this piece will grade as good and most likely better than the $20 note listed above. If there was ever a time to acquire rare proof obsoletes; that time is now. GEM NEW  $1295  

Reverse

   GA  $ 100

   The City Bank

 

    50-G-14c

 

 

     PROOF

 

 

     Augusta

 

 

 

  SENC/HAXBY

 

 

 

 

PCGS Superb Gem       

  New 67 PPQ                      

No serial number, proof. Pre-American Bank Note Company archives sale. Maid with eagle in clouds to upper left. Three maidens to lower right; thought to be Navigation (standing), Agriculture and Education (both seated). Beautiful Red-orange tint. Plain back and printed upon very thin, onion skin like paper. Assigned the unheard of grade of Superb Gem New 67 by PCGS. Christies sale above mentioned did little to increase this note's availability. Prior to Christies sale; Haxby could not confirm a surviving example of this very note as of 1989. One, two subject note sheet was contained in the Christies sale. An incredibly rare Southern proof If one desires rarity; quality beyond words and incredible eye appeal, you can't go wrong here. Only a hand full of 160 year old obsolete notes; proof or not, will attain this grade level. To see a note of this rarity contained in a Superb Gem New 67 grading service holder is nearly beyond comprehension. The first time I have ever had the privilege of offering the scarcer (tinted) City Bank $20, $50 and $100 at the same time and the only tinted (14b, 14c) $100 or $50 (12b, 12c) City Bank Proof I have had the pleasure of owning.

PCGS SUPERB

NEW NEW 67

 

PPQ

 

Premium

Paper

Quality                  

 $2750  

Reverse

  GA 15 Cents

          THE    

  CONFEDERATE

     EXCHANGE

 

       Unlisted

 

 L. Henry & Co.

 

       Augusta

 

 

 

 

 

 PCGS ABOUT

    NEW 50

          

 

 

 

 

 

 

       EXCESSIVELY          

    RARE & PERHAPS         

          UNIQUE      

Serial # 153. No date, although no doubt a Civil War merchant issued piece. Two houses to the left and right of "Augusta". Cadet or soldier in full dress holding sword to mid left. "15" at each corner. Plain back. One of the most desirable, attractive and well preserved Southern pieces extant. I have seen one other "Confederate Exchange" piece from Manchester, Tennessee; although not nearly as well preserved as this note. Roughly 20 years ago, I observed roughly one half of a note identical to the piece offered here; which brought an amazing sum at the time. While the grading service does not mention the merchant's name; it appears to me to be L. Henry & Co. I have not researched this merchant, although I am sure that by utilizing the many means available today; the firm could be found. The fact that this surreal note survived at all is indeed unbelievable. That it survived in this state of preservation is nearly beyond belief. Most pieces from this era are torn, tattered, split, stained and bear many so called problems. In reality, if the piece is rare enough, such tears, etc. make absolutely no difference to advanced collectors. No such concerns here. Few of these small merchant notes were printed to begin with; especially in very small towns and villages. There was no reason for them to be saved, as they did not present with the "glitz" or appeal of a Confederate Treasury note. I can say that there exists a very large collector base for them and I can most assuredly understand why. One of, if not the finest pieces I have ever had the opportunity to offer. It combines great rarity, quality and unsurpassed desirability. A truly amazing opportunity which is not likely to present itself again. Simply an amazing piece of Americana.

PCGS

About New 50

   SOLD

 

Reverse

    GA  $500

      Mechanics Bank                 

         of Augusta

 

          60-G42                            

 

 

 

Haxby Plate Note      

        

 

        Serial # 25

 

 

 

 

 

    PCGS Very Fine 25

           Apparent                        

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      January, 1856

Serial # 25. Dated January 1, 1856. Three maidens in center flanked on each side by "500". Minerva standing to right. Large, vertical "500" to left. Plain back. Extremely rare. Very few banks printed notes which were higher than $100 in denomination. The Bank of Louisiana comes to mind. Nonetheless, few did and this is likely one of the finest you will see. The Haxby Plate note, as seen upon page 251 of that reference. PCGS denotes Hinge remnants on back and Small edge tears. The remnants are not the least bit distracting and are actually not caught by the eye unless one looks for them. I see no small edge tears save for one. I do see four or five microscopic edge dings or chinks outside the frame line above the right serial # 25. There is a tiny edge tear which does go into the body of the note above the left "500" from the front. In most cases, I advise collectors to avoid notes which bear tears. Upon dispensing such advice, I am referring to notes which are available and not excessively rare. Sometimes we have to take a step back and think about what we are actually viewing. There are perhaps two or maybe three of these high denomination notes known. None are as nice as this one. It was the best Haxby could find and it is likely the best anyone will ever find. In a perfect world, all of these wonderful pieces of history would be immaculate and free of any problems whatsoever. This note is nearly 162 years old and printed upon very thin paper. I would be surprised if the note did not have an issue or two. Advanced collectors are well aware of this and do not let something as trivial as what you see here prevent them from acquiring a great rarity. Such is the very reason that we see rare obsolete notes in "Apparent" grading service holders sell for thousands and thousands of dollars on a regular basis. In reality; "Apparent" or not, a wonderful obsolete bank note of immense rarity. I certainly know of no means whereby one could find another. A superb high denomination rarity.

PCGS Very Fine

  25  Apparent

 $1395  

Reverse

   GA  $ 50

       Mechanics Bank                          of Augusta          

         M-449                                   Brokers Stamp

      Augusta 1856

Serial # 390. A very neat brokers stamp adorns this note. "E. Withington. Collector And Exchange Office. Savannah, Geo.".  Stamped notes have not been the subject of much study and are just beginning to come into their own. A neat piece for a very reasonable price.  VG+  $130  

Reverse

   GA

 

 

 

 

 

 $  5

    Southern Bank

      of Georgia

     80  G-10a

  Bainbridge 1858

Serial # 3791. Red "FIVE" overprint. Interesting central vignette of Father, two children and their dog. Some type of red "O" control stamp or the like on front. Clean, bright and fresh. A tough note to find in decent condition; as it is quite easy to assume that there is an unlimited supply of these. Nothing could be further from the truth. Fresh and as crisp as new. The "fold" looking line at the upper right back is a sheet crimp. It is raised on the front and "sunken" on the back. The same scenario presents itself at the upper left. It would appear that quality control was not functioning properly the day this note was printed; as these are as made. Still, a very nice obsolete.   XF+  $350  

Reverse

   GA

 

 

 

 

 $  2

    Southern Bank

      of Georgia

     80  G-8a

  Bainbridge 1858

Serial # 2442. A gorgeous note by Danforth & Wright of New York & Philadelphia. The central vignette of harvesting wheat led to the contemporaneous alteration of this note in Northern States to several different fraudulent banks. I have seen several such notes from Vermont, New Hampshire and Connecticut. Blazing red color and as crisp as new. What you see to the far left from the back running vertically; is not a fold, but a raised area or a sheet crimp and as made. This note saw little, if any use. Superb eye appeal. XF/AU  $395  

Reverse

   GA  $ 1

        Bank of Columbus          

            105 G 10c       

 

      Columbus, 1858         

 

 

 

PCGS GEM NEW

        66 PPQ

 

 

 

 

       PROOF

No serial number; proof. Standard hole out cancels. Engraved date of January 10, 1858. Bank title in center. Large, red "ONE" overprint. Vignette of slave driving a wagon of cotton bales at lower center. Young boy within oval to lower left (CSA T-32). Woman holding wheat and scythe to mid right. "ONE", and "1" on dies, upper left, right and lower right. Plain back, with red ABNCo stamp. Simply a pristine proof if there ever was one. The proof $1 note from the bank of Columbus was printed upon a sheet containing 4 notes; $1, $1, $1 & $2. While not an excessively rare proof; it is indeed scarce in this lofty state of preservation. Between September 13, 1990 and June 5, 1991; Christie's of New York held various, now famous sales of the American Bank Note Company archives. A rather large number of proof sheets were impaired; bearing tape repairs, tears, missing pieces, poor trim, water stains, etc.. Locating a $1 Bank of Columbus proof may not be extremely difficult; however, locating an immaculate example such as the note offered here is quite another story. In my opinion, obsolete proofs are far too cheap at this time and will no doubt rise in value substantially soon enough. I have observed this cycle before. The fact that any proof obsolete bank note may be acquired for less than $1,000 is truly amazing; given their rarity and vast collector base. Encountering any obsolete note (proof or circulated) graded Gem New 66 is near impossible. Simply superb quality and eye appeal. A mind boggling run of scarce Bank of Columbus proofs follow; including the incredibly rare $50 and $100.

PCGS GEM

 NEW 66 PPQ

 

Premium

Paper

Quality

 $750  

Reverse

   GA  $ 1

       Bank of Columbus          

       105 G UNLISTED      

 

       Columbus, 1858            

 

    TINTED

 

 

    PCGS GEM NEW                  

           65 PPQ          

 

 

 

 

 

          PROOF                      

 

    Not listed in Haxby               

No serial number; proof mounted on card stock. Standard hole out cancels. Engraved date of January 10, 1858. Bank title in center. Vignette of slave driving a wagon of cotton bales at lower center. Young boy within oval to lower left (CSA T-32). Woman holding wheat and scythe to mid right. "ONE", and "1" on dies, upper left, right and lower right. Plain back. Partial "Property of American Bank Note Company Co" stamp upon back; wherein entire uncut proof sheet was stamped. Nearly identical in all respects to the above proof; save for the striking tint and large white "ONE". This proof reminds one more of a "City Bank" proof from Augusta (see above). Just a few other very subtle differences in the above $1 proof and this one. This note carries the patent date of "June 2nd, 1857" just below the right "C" plate letter to the bottom right; whereas the above $1 proof does not. Further, the above note bears an "American Bank Note Company" monogram just to the top left of the portrait of the young boy and this gorgeous piece does not. An unknown proof 20 years ago with this version being extremely scarce even now. This note; along with most every note here listed cannot be "looked up" from a value perspective in some book. It just doesn't work that way now and never has. Far too many variables come into play; such as availability, survival rate, etc.. Indeed a worthy subject for another section. Rarity wise; many multiples more scarce than the 105 G 10c listed above. A blazing, scarce proof that would fit quite well into the very finest of collections. Superb eye appeal and simply gorgeous..

PCGS Gem New

       65 PPQ

 

 

 

Premium

Paper

Quality

 $1375  

Reverse
Pic 2

   GA  $ 5

       Bank of Columbus               

          105 G-30P    

 

       Columbus, 1856          

 

            PROOF          

No serial #. Proof. Central vignette of locomotive passing under bridge. George Washington in oval to lower right. Plain back.  A superb proof from this very sound and popular financial institution in Columbus, GA.. Columbus was quite the financial center during the Civil War and was home to James Whitfield; a Confederate Depositary agent and banker. The proof offered here is snow white, bears perfect trim and immaculate eye appeal. As with many proofs of the era, a "Property of American Bank Note Co." stamp may be seen on the back. This is a contemporary proof made for presentation to bank officials for approval in the 1850's...not a proprietary proof. In other words, the real thing. Gorgeous.

CHOICE

 UNC/PROOF

 $875  

Reverse

   GA  $10

         Bank of Columbus                  

           105 G-40a            

 

       Columbus, 1859            

Serial # 666. Printed date of January 1, 1859. A well trimmed and quite appealing example of this mid grade $10 issue from Columbus, GA. Slight rust exhibited upon the left back; although nothing one would not expect at this grade level. A well respected bank, notes from this institution circulated widely and were well received. The American Bank Note Company imprint may be seen just to the left of the middle vignette. Above average color.  FINE  $135  

Reverse

   GA  $ 50

        Bank of Columbus             

            105 G 60b            

 

        Columbus, 1859               

 

 

 

            PCGS

      VERY CHOICE        

           NEW 64      

       

 

          PROOF      

 

 

 

 

       Extremely Rare       

No serial number; proof. Hole out cancelled. Bank title at upper center. Engraved date of January 1, 1859. "L" and "50" upon intricate, colorful dies, left and right. Gorgeous vignette of steamboat, train, covered bridge and farmland in the distance at lower left. George Washington in oval surrounded by red design to lower right. American Bank Note Company imprint at middle bottom. Red ABNCo stamp on back. This note (proof or circulated) was assigned a SENC (Surviving Example Not Confirmed) designation by Haxby preceding the sale of the American Bank Note Company archives. As the Christies auctions offered primarily proofs; the same SENC holds true today of the circulated note; a true obsolete bank note rarity. The $50 proof note was printed upon a sheet with two $20 notes, the $50 note and one $100 note. Between September of 1990 and June of 1991; Christies of New York conducted the sale of the American Bank Note Company archives. A very meager total of three sheets containing the $50 note (60b w/ABNCo imprint here offered) were sold; one of which was severely damaged. Incredibly rare and a choice proof, by any standards. I have no clue as to why this note grades 64 instead of 65,66,67, or 68. Vivid color and choice trim. As clean and spotless as one could ever hope for with incredible eye appeal. Of the three examples extant, the note offered here is by far the finest. Rarity and quality; a combination which one can never go wrong with.

PCGS VERY

CHOICE NEW

       64

 

 

PROOF

 $2375  

Reverse

    GA  $ 50

 Bank of Columbus

   105 G 60b

 

Columbus, 1859

 Fully signed and

     Issued

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Extremely Rare

Serial # 333. Engraved date of January 1, 1859. Bank title at upper center. "L" and "50" upon intricate, colorful dies, left and right. Gorgeous vignette of steamboat, train, covered bridge and farmland in the distance at lower left. George Washington in oval surrounded by red design to lower right. American Bank Note Company imprint at middle bottom. Plain back. Printed upon extremely thin paper and simply a magnificent example of this great rarity. Listed in Haxby as SENC (Surviving Example Not Confirmed), we know today that three or four examples exist. Of the survivors, at least two are damaged. The note offered here is undamaged and simply breathtaking. Two tiny pinholes, which are very difficult to detect are noted for accuracies sake. Amazingly clean and bright, possessing superb eye appeal. Haxby valued this note at $175 in VF; an astronomical sum for an obsolete note in 1988. Keep in mind; at that same time, a Confederate, Montgomery $100 T-3 in this grade or better could be purchased for $400-$500. That same T-3 today will easily fetch $12-$15,000. The value assigned by Haxby, some 28 years ago, could be considered from a different galaxy today. Another "opportunity" note. No values were assigned beyond the grade of VF. One seldom has the opportunity to see one of these, much less own one. By far, the best I've ever seen or heard of.

Fine+/Very Fine

 

 

Mkt

Grade: VF 30

 $1575  

Reverse

   GA  $ 2

TOM BRASSILL

      UNL

 

      Columbus

 September 1, 1862

  Extremely Rare

No serial number. Central vignette of steam paddle wheel ship. Small portrait of a duck at bottom. No imprint. Printed date of September 1, 1862. Brown "TWO" overprint. I can learn little about Tom Brassill; although obviously a merchant in Columbus, Georgia during the Civil War. Columbus is situate upon the Chattahoochee River in Muscogee County just across the river from Alabama. The city was a major industrial complex in the South during this time; second only to Richmond. Unlike the $1 piece listed below; this note does not list the store's location. However, this does not mean that Brassill moved; although may have decided to change his scrip. Unlisted in any reference and excessively rare. A true miracle of survival; as these rare merchant scrip pieces were not saved. Slight foxing in limited areas; although far and away better than pieces like this are normally found. Anyone who collects merchant scrip is well aware that one is lucky to locate a note like this in one piece. Not one single pinhole or problem and a note which is multiple times more rare than a CSA Montgomery or the like. The first I have owned and a rare opportunity for the Georgia specialist or any collector of Civil War Fiscal memorabilia.  CHOICE

    F/VF

 $675  

Reverse

   GA  $ 1

TOM BRASSILL

      UNL

     Columbus

  February 1, 1862

  Extremely Rare

Corner - Oglethorpe

 & Randolph Streets

No serial number. Cornucopia filled with what appear to be coins at top. Turkey at bottom. No imprint. Brownish "ONE" overprint. Printed date of February 1, 1862. Bold, legible signature of Tom Brassill. Unlike the $2 Brassill piece listed above; this note denotes the location of Brassill's store. "Corner of Oglethorpe and Randolph streets" is clearly visible. When viewing the note in person; it appears that a "2" was placed upon the cornucopia and partially removed. This is not evident in the scan; however adds to the appeal of this excessively rare note. No pinholes or problems. I cannot imagine locating a piece such as this any nicer. A most desirable note that was printed 7 months prior to the above piece. Incredible.

CHOICE

 FINE+

 $795  

Reverse

   GA  $ 5

Manufacturers &

Mechanics Bank

     120 G16

    Columbus

  November 1, 1854

Serial # 4413. Engraved date of November 1, 1854. Tellus seated with pole to lower right exactly as depicted upon the 1861 Confederate issue; T-8. Superb trim and inking. Extremely tough to locate in collectible condition. Much more so than one might think. No pinholes, chinks, tears or problems of any kind. Bold, vivid signatures and serial number. If such existed; one could look through hundreds of these and not locate an example this clean, bright and fresh. Totally problem free and quite scarce as such.

CHOICE

  FINE+

MKT

Grade VF

 $325  

Reverse

   GA  $10

Bank of St. Mary's

      265 G38A

November 16, 1846

    Columbus

      X-Ford

Serial # 7755. Dated November 16, 1846. One of the earliest products of Rawdon, Wright & Hatch of New York to bear a red protector or overprint. Much more difficult to locate than one would think; then again, nearly 170 years have passed since it was issued. This note has never been easy, even in the "olden times" of the early 80's. From the vast holdings of John J. Ford. Some edge roughness in a place or two, although no major problems. One can seek this issue for years and not locate it. An attractive, clean and very early obsolete.

Fine/

Edge bump.

MKT:

VF+

 $350  

Reverse

   GA  50 Cents

        Cool Springs                           Wilkinson County   

         Willis Allen                                      UNL

 

 

 

 

  SERIAL # 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

    PCGS Very Fine 20            

    Apparent "Mounting"

 

                

 

 

 Extremely Rare & Perhaps

              Unique

Serial # 10. Blue ink date of July 7, 1862. However, the note was printed in the 1840's, as may be seen when looking at the date "1862". Underneath the blue ink "62" is a printed "4"; which would have been followed by another number representing the exact year in 1840 the note was issued. Simply an astonishing piece of history. Between a "50" at the left and a "50" at the right, lies an allegorical maiden emptying a cornucopia of coins. Handwritten blue ink "No" on each side followed by the serial number of "10". No doubt, Willis Allen was "recycling" paper upon which he issued this note. He is listed in 1860 Georgia census as a farmer and merchant. Apparently quite prosperous, he had assets of over $100,000; which in 1860 was no small sum. PCGS notes "mounting" upon the back of the note. Relative to a rarity such as this; the mounting is meaningless and does not distract from the overall eye appeal or desirability of the note whatsoever. The fact that this piece survived at all is a true miracle and no collector of such rarities expects these pieces to be flawless. In fact, for a piece of Americana this rare, it's condition is far and away above that normally encountered. A note which one could spend days researching and a true delight. I am sometimes amazed that such pieces of American history are available at all today. A note which would disappoint no one and which the most discriminating collector would be proud to own.

PCGS Very Fine

 20 Apparent

  "Mounting"

 $1025  

Reverse

   GA  50 Cents

   Coweta County

      UNL

 August 22, 1862

 

  EXCESSIVELY

      RARE    

Serial # 412.  Printed date of August 22, 1862. An incredibly rare piece from Coweta County, GA. Located some 30 miles southwest of Atlanta; the Coweta County seat is located at Newnan. Printed upon a light blue, lined paper and absolutely amazing. Slight aging may be seen at the center; however, is not distracting at all. No pinholes or any other problems and perfect trim. Payable in "Confederate Bills"; most likely at Newnan. The signature appears to be that of Andrew J. Barry, Chairman of the Inferior Court of Coweta County. Notes like this are virtually non existent. Rarely does the occasion arise wherein a collector has the opportunity to own such an incredible piece of history as this wonderful piece. CHOICE FINE           $1125  

Reverse

    GA

   15  

 Cents

  DAHLONEGA

 

  

 

   UNL

 

 

 

 C. A. Befsen (?)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      1861

 

 

 

 

 Amazing Note !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Muscalus Plate

       Note

No serial number. "Dahlonega, 1861 (15 cents" printed. As this piece was unknown to numismatists until recently, the best guess for the signature is "C. A. Befsen", perhaps a merchant in the still producing gold fields of North Georgia. Printed upon the back of a $10 Pigeon Roost Mining Company note, which was the first gold mining scrip issued in the United States. Dahlonega derives it's name from the Cherokee Indian name for "yellow" or "gold". Located in the North Georgia mountains, Dahlonega was the scene of the first major gold rush in the United States commencing in the 1820's. Unknown to many who do not collect coins, most of the domestically produced gold utilized in the minting of gold coins in the United States until the California gold rush came from the area surrounding Dalonega. The United States established a mint there in 1838 which produced gold coins until 1861. Upon the discovery of gold in California in 1849, many, if not most miners, headed west. Not all; as steady, commercial gold production continued here until around 1933. Gold is found to this day in these gorgeous North Georgia mountains. As this mountainous terrain was extremely isolated and not conducive to Civil War battles, coupled with the residents of the mountains being very independent and the like; it is this writers humble opinion that this extremely odd denomination piece is "gold scrip". The fact that the piece is printed upon the back of Pigeon Roost Mining notes, the extremely odd denomination and ever appealing crudeness of the piece further contribute to this conclusion. Additionally, the early date of 1861 is far too soon to be observed upon a piece of Civil War paper or Sutler scrip located within these rugged, isolated mountains. I haven't the room here to set forth all of my reasoning. To date, I have been unable to learn anything about C. A. Befsen. PCGS mentions a "small repair at left and some small rust stains at the upper right". Hardly a matter of importance relative to a piece of this significance. Likely unique and incredibly rare. A potential piece of Southern gold mining history and truly a numismatic prize for the ages. One which should be housed in a quality museum; or perhaps your collection. One of the most intriguing pieces of Americana I have ever seen. There is more to say about this piece than there is space!

PCGS Fine 12

Apparent

 

 

 

 

 Muscalus Plate

       Note

 $2500

  HOLD

 

Reverse

    GA  $  5

     Planters and 

  Mechanics Bank 

     150 G 10b

   Dalton 1856

 

 

 

 

 

    PCGS Choice About           

        New 58 PPQ            

Serial # 1231. Engraved date of July 1, 1855, however the last "5" in "1855" has a "6" written over it....as it should have. Bank title above. George Washington in oval to right. Man seated with bundle of wheat and sickle to left. Very appealing central vignette of men on horseback, dogs and a "fox hunt". Plain back. Simply an immaculate obsolete bank note and pristine. The red initials "My" ? are frequently seen upon notes from this bank. At this point in time, no one knows what they stand for, nor is the purpose known for the black "Clinton" stamp. To me, such traits only add to the allure of collecting obsolete bank notes. Earning the PPQ or Premium Paper Quality designation from PCGS; a somewhat uncommon, although most desirable moniker. This tells us the paper this note was printed upon is superb and that any fold driving the note down to AU-58 is light and does not break the paper. A wonderful example of the issue and a note anyone would be proud to own.

PCGS CHOICE

ABOUT NEW 58

        PPQ

 

Premium

Paper

Quality

 $465  

Reverse

   GA  $ 2

     Planters and 

  Mechanics Bank 

     150 G 5b

   Dalton 1856

Serial # 1134. Central vignette of wild horses. Man in front of factory to upper left and woman with birds to lower left. Plain back. Engraved date of July 1st, 1855; hand changed to July 1st 1856. Immaculate trim and superb eye appeal. A light foxing spot shows at the upper right reverse; much more so than when viewing the note in person. All notes emitted from Dalton, GA are just not to be had currently. These were never common, although were seen from time to time. Not so now. No pinholes and superb eye appeal. A light horizontal bend. Very pleasing and a desirable note.    AU  $450  

Reverse

   GA  $ 1

     Planters and 

  Mechanics Bank 

     150 G 2b

   Dalton 1856 

Serial # 825. Same vignettes as above. Engraved date of July 1st, 1855 changed to July 1st, 1856 by hand in brown ink. The white, or non tinted version of the above note. Keep in mind, only the $1, $2 and $5 note are known on this scarce Dalton, GA bank. No folds, pinholes or problems of any kind. Housed in a GEM CU holder when I acquired it. The note is trimmed ever so closely at the top right from the front. Holding to my conservative grading principles, I cannot call the note Gem. It is but a breath away. Again, the first I have seen in a good long while and a beauty.

UNC+++

Nearly GEM

 $475  

Reverse

    GA  $ 2      Bank of Whitfield  

         In Dalton                           

         155 G 4             

 

         

 

 

  PCGS Very Choice New 64 

 

 

 

 

    Dalton, January 1, 1860

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Former Eric P. Newman

Serial # 2448. (Stamped- see CSA T-57). Printed date of January 1, 1860. Central vignette of man and woman harvesting wheat. "2" on die, upper right and upper left. Indian maiden to lower left. Group of three Indians to lower right. Plain back. 99.999 % of examples of this issue encountered are remainders. Downright rare issued. Formerly the Planters and Mechanics Bank; acquired by a firm from the State of Illinois in 1855 and the name changed to the Bank of Whitfield. Dalton was the location of the parent bank; although records indicate that a branch was established at Dahlonega. No known notes exist from that branch however. Simply an incredible note retaining original embossing. Totally original margins which are slightly uneven, thus the grade of Very Choice New 64. This note provides a classic opportunity to observe a position I have taken since the grading services came along. There exists more than ample space for someone in this day and time to "trim" this note and "even up" the margins. Had such been performed prior to submission for grading in this case; one would see a grade here of 66, 67 or better. Obviously, Eric P. Newman or the Newman Foundation would not perform such an act; thereby altering the note's originality. While I am not stating that all "perfectly" margined notes have been "trimmed" in modern times, the temptation to do so is strong among many. Herein lies the opportunity to acquire a quite rare (if issued), 157 year old hand trimmed note remaining in it's original, amazing state of preservation.

PCGS Very Choice New 64     $475  

Reverse

    GA  $  1 Bank of Whitfield  

         In Dalton                           

         155 G 2                 

 

     

 PCGS Choice About New 58 

 

 

 

    Dalton, January 1, 1860

 

 

 

 

   Former Eric P. Newman      

Serial # 383. Printed date of January 1, 1860. Central vignette of man feeding horse and apple, dog and cow. "ONE" on die, upper right and left. Blacksmith with anvil in oval to lower left. Man and woman harvesting wheat to lower right; being the same central vignette as that seen on the $2 Bank of Whitfield note above. Another splendid example of the issue acquired long ago and held for decades in the famous Eric P. Newman Collection. Huge, original margins and superb eye appeal. No ink bleed or burn. The appearance upon the back wherein the note was signed upon the front is a very, very common occurrence relative to obsolete and Confederate bank notes. In fact, this is quite normal. Were there any burn or bleed through, one may rest assured that the grading service would have graded this "Apparent" and called out the problem. Nearly always found in remainder form, a rare opportunity to acquire a fully issued example of this extremely desirable issue.

PCGS Choice       

About New 58

 $395  

Reverse

   GA  $ 1

 Bank of Whitfield

     In Dalton

   155 G 2

    Dalton  1860

   CHOICE CU

No serial #. Remainder. Man feeds horse alongside dog and farm animals in Center. Portrait of Blacksmith to lower left and same wheat harvesting vignette as that which appears on the $2 note to lower right. Bright white and superb contrast. As stated, not a common remainder. A piece like this reminds one of how the true engravers art is represented upon these wonderful, old notes. We see nothing remotely close to this today. Simply superb with incredible eye appeal. No pinholes or other problems.

CHOICE

    CU

 $235  

Reverse

    GA  $  2

Inferior Court of Elbert County 

 

           UNL

 

 

     Elberton, GA 1862

 

 

 

     PCGS Very Fine 25             

Serial # 275. Dated August 12, 1862. Indian maiden with bow and arrow quiver behind her back to left. Green "$2" upper left and right. "TWO DOLLARS" in green. Plain back. A splendid example of this tough Georgia county issue. Extremely scarce without problems and this example bears none. Elberton was designated the county seat of Elbert county in 1790 and is located in the Northeastern portion of the state. In 1860, Elberton had a population of roughly 725 people. Amazingly well preserved, bearing wonderful trim and superb eye appeal. No pinholes, chinks or problems of any kind and simply an incredible example of this extremely tough county note. Rare in this grade and problem free.

PCGS Very Fine 

         25               

 $575  

Reverse

    GA  $  1

         Bank of                       

    Greensborough             

 

         165 G2d                            

 

    Greensborough                 

 

 

 

  December 7, 1858       

 

 

     

 

    SERIAL # 10                                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PMG Choice Uncirculated 64 

                                               

    

                                          

 

 

Serial # 10. Engraved date of December 7, 1858. Bank title at top center. Superb central vignette of steam locomotive arriving at station which is very similar to the much coveted Confederate Montgomery T-3. Single axle wagon stopped next to man and woman (with basket upon her head) to lower left. "ONE" on die to upper left. "1" atop die to upper right. Young girl seated to lower right. Plain back. Engraved signatures for Cashier and President. American Bank Note Company monogram beneath and to the left of left, upper "ONE". A gorgeous example of the issue. While PMG mentions "annotations" and "stains", I respectfully take exception to this. PCGS; correctly so, no longer uses the word "annotations" when old prices or type numbers are found written on the back of these notes. I have gone into this in detail elsewhere upon this site. Obsolete bank notes, Civil War era scrip and Confederate Treasury notes were never legal tender as old Federal notes were. I have handled hundreds of CSA and obsolete bank notes with these types of numbers. I have acquired CSA T-15's with the price of $1.25 and old Bradbeer numbers (1915) written on the back. This was normal. Without writing a treatise here, suffice it to say that collectors simply wrote the price and type number on the note itself. The collecting of obsoletes and CSA was tiny compared to what it is today. Were this graffiti or a Federal note, I could understand this notation. PMG got it's start with Federal notes and there stayed for years. Perhaps understandably, they cannot seem to grasp the history of the hobby. As I am running out of space; suffice it to say that the note is not stained. There is some light foxing at the lower right back, which affects nothing. The paper is only 160 years old...imagine that! While the grading services serve a useful purpose to many collectors, they do sometimes baffle those of us who have been doing this for over four decades and many times longer than they have. A choice note which is superbly inked and possessing wonderful eye appeal. The opportunity to acquire a two digit serial number obsolete presents itself very, very rarely. While some 1864 Confederate $5, $10 or $20 issues may be found on rare occasion consecutively numbered; it is unheard of to locate two consecutively numbered obsolete bank notes. Coupled with the note below, herein lies that once in a lifetime opportunity. From the renowned Alan Dorris collection, the finest Georgia collection ever assembled. Amazing.

PMG Choice

Uncirculated 64

 $550  

Reverse

    GA  $  2

        Bank of                       

    Greensborough             

 

         165 G4c                        

              

     Blue Overprint         

 

    Greensborough           

 

   PCGS Very Fine 30 PPQ

    Premium Paper Quality   

 

         June 1, 1858                                                    

Serial # 4803. Engraved date of June 1, 1858. Bank title at center. "TWO" atop elaborate die. "2" on dies, left and right. Slave holding basket of cotton to lower left. Maiden seated to lower right. Engraved signatures. Plain back. Same design as the serial # 9, two dollar note listed below; save for the blue "TWO" overprint. Notes upon this bank bearing the overprint are a good bit tougher than those without. Fully framed and then some, especially at the lower left front. Totally problem free and assigned the PCGS moniker of PPQ or Premium Paper Quality. Not frequently seen upon an obsolete bank note at this grade level. A splendid note upon this Greensboro, Georgia bank which was once part of the famous Eric P. Newman collection.

PCGS Very Fine

      30 PPQ     

 

Premium

Paper

Quality

 $375

  SOLD

 

Reverse

    GA  $  2

        Bank of                       

    Greensborough             

 

         165 G4d                            

 

    Greensborough                        

 

 

 

  December 7, 1858                   

 

    SERIAL # 9          

 

 

                                                   

 PCGS Choice About New 58

 PPQ Premium Paper Quality 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SERIAL # 9. Engraved date of December 7, 1858. Bank title at center. "TWO" atop elaborate die. "2" on dies, left and right. Slave holding basket of cotton to lower left. Maiden seated to lower right. Engraved signatures; which is most unusual. Plain back. Most banks of this era desired actual brown ink signatures of the Cashier and President to deter counterfeiting. Not so with the Bank of Greensborough relative to their lower denomination issues. The bank emitted only $1, $2, $5, and $10 notes during it's brief existence from 1856 to 1858. An extremely light, faint corner fold exists at the lower left back. Trimmed just a fraction tight at the upper right front; although a breathtaking note....especailly for a single digit serial numbered piece. The odds of locating a single digit serial number upon an obsolete bank note from any location are astronomically low. Add the fact that this note emanates from the famous Eric P. Newman collection and we have the makings of a true rarity. The American Bank Note Company monogram is located at the bottom left, adjacent to the signature for Cashier. A most attractive obsolete bank note bearing irreplaceable traits and which one absolutely cannot go wrong with. An "opportunity" note if there ever was one, especailly when one considers that the serial number 10 $1 note is listed above.

PCGS Choice   

About New 58

PPQ

 

Premium

Paper

Quality

 $525  

Reverse

    GA  $  5

         Bank of                       

    Greensborough             

 

         165 G6a                            

 

    Greensborough                 

 

 

 

         May 2, 1857                

 

 

 

            GEM CU                                                    

Serial # 2335. Dated May 2, 1857. Men cutting trees in center. Men picking corn to lower right and sheep shearing scene to lower left. Large red "FIVE" overprint. Plain back. A superb obsolete; the likes of which are just not seen in dealer's inventory today. Not one single problem. No pinholes, chinks, soiling...nothing! The days of locating any obsolete note in this lofty state of preservation are rapidly disappearing. To say that I I have been disappointed with the quality and number of nice obsolete bank notes I see when walking the floor of any major show is the understatement of the year. This note never has been easy to acquire in this incredible grade. Simply put; a gorgeous note which one could look for years and not locate.

GEM

UNCIRCULATED

 $595  

Reverse

    GA  25 Cents

           JASPER, GA

               A. Hunter       

 

 

                                                         Unlisted & Likely Unique         

 

 

 

 

       PCGS Very Fine 25        

   Apparent-  Small Edge Tear     

No serial #. Dated June 1862 at Jasper, GA. Vignette of locomotive with passenger car top right. "25" to left. Plain back. An amazing miracle of survival from this small town located some 50 miles North of Atlanta. The population of Jasper in 1880 was 146 and likely lower in 1862. A. Hunter maintained a small merchandise store in Jasper at this time and it is most likely that the number of actual pieces of store scrip he had printed was extremely small to begin with. Located in Pickens County Georgia. Two insignificant margin chinks or very small tears with affect nothing; especially relative to a piece this rare. In reality, amazing well preserved for such a Civil War era piece. The only such note known and an opportunity which comes along only once during one's lifetime.

PCGS VERY

FINE 25 Apparent

 

 

"Small Edge Tear

at Bottom Left of

     Center"

 $675  

Reverse

   GA  $ 20

  Georgia Savings

        Bank

     UNL

      Macon

 

  June 15, 1863

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Pay in Confederate

   Treasury Notes

Serial # 4205.  Printed date of June 15, 1863. Oval in center of Maiden holding wheat. Slaves in Cotton field to lower right, and from Keatinge and Ball's Confederate T-23; an oval portrait of man with corn ("The Corn Gatherer"). Brilliant red "XX" overprint. Plain back. The Georgia Savings Bank $5, $10 and $20 notes are always in heavy demand; extremely difficult to locate in decent grade with anywhere near good color. One of the very few obsolete bank notes payable in "Confederate Treasury Notes" and about as "Civil War" as you can get. This example illustrates "ink feathering" at the beginning of the signature of the President to the lower right. This is not a stain. Quill pens loaded with ink were set upon this paper for signatures. Tricky to use; someone could well have distracted the signer as he set his pen to paper, thereby causing him to leave it there for a second too long. Contemporary feathering is a matter of personal taste; although I know it has never concerned me or most collectors I know. If you see many notes from this period; you will encounter ink feathering due to the use of a quill pen. This note, along with the following $10 and $5 note are as crisp and fresh as new. There is handling which is not evident in the scan. The yellowing in the scan is not seen when viewing the note in person; you would not even know it was present. A very tough note in most any grade; however, downright scarce in this grade. A peach.

CHOICE

    VF++

 $375  

Reverse

   GA $ 10

  Georgia Savings

        Bank

     UNL

 

      Macon

 

  June 15, 1863

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Watermarked "FIVE"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Payable CSA Notes

Serial # 3044. Printed date of June 15, 1863. Bank title in center. Printed upon thick, quality bank note paper which was manufactured by the American Bank Note Company. Cattle to mid left and farmer plowing behind mule to mid right. Large "X" protector. Red "TEN" overprint. Plain back. A very attractive example of this extremely interesting issue printed by Keatinge & Ball. While it is not unusual to encounter merchant scrip which was printed and disbursed during the Civil War; it is most uncommon to observe an actual bank note emanating from a Southern bank which was chartered and established during the Civil War. Here, we have just such a note. Payable in "Confederate Treasury or current Bank notes" may be seen upon the front. Few are the number of banks which were established in the South during the Civil War. An additional intriguing aspect of this note is the fact that it is printed upon paper watermarked "FIVE". Some 10,000 sheets of "FIVE" and "TEN" watermarked paper were seized by the Confederacy from the American Bank Note Company's branch in New Orleans at the outbreak of the Civil War. The paper was sent to Keatinge & Ball where it was used upon Confederate Treasury notes Type 24 and Type 33. This same watermarked paper was utilized by Keatinge & Ball in the printing of some Commonwealth of Virginia notes, along with the 1863, $3 State North Carolina issue. Obviously; a small portion of this watermarked paper was utilized upon some of the private Georgia Savings Bank notes being printed by Keatinge & Ball at the time and here offered. Just an overall neat piece of history which raises more questions than answers. No pinholes or problems and a note which looks much better in person than in the scan. In all probability; extremely rare bearing the watermark; although there is no manner to definitively determine how much watermarked paper was so used. It is most likely that Keatinge & Ball used most of it for the Confederacy and the States of Virginia and North Carolina; as these would have been much larger contracts. A gorgeous note bearing a wonderful history and quite a story to tell.

CHOICE

VERY FINE

 

 

MKT

GRADE:

XF 40

 $395  

Reverse

   GA  $ 5

  Harris County

       1862

     UNLISTED

Serial # 290. Dated Oct 21, 1862 in brown ink. A very scarce "higher denomination" of this most desirable Georgia piece. Extremely well inked with superb color and contrast. Fully framed and printed upon extremely thin paper. Next to impossible to find; much less this nice. A super neat imprint of "H. P. Hill Engravers and Fancy Job Printers. Griffin, Georgia". You will not see that imprint very often; if at all. A superb Georgia note.

CHOICE     

    AU

 $550  

Reverse

   GA  $ 3

   Harris County

      1862

    UNLISTED

Serial # 358. Another immaculate example of this extremely scarce note. The $3 is most definitely an odd denomination and is quite rare as such. Dated in brown ink Oct 21, 1862 and superb. Fully framed and extremely thin. Somewhat irregular cut at the bottom; however this is outside of the frame line. If you are looking for a scarce; high quality Georgia piece; you cannot go wrong here.

UNC

Nearly

Choice.

 $625  

Reverse

     GA  $  2

   O.C. Horne, Hawkinsville     

 

                 UNL       

 

     Agency Planters Bank

 

        June 1, 1862 

 

 

 

 

    PCGS Very Fine 25         

 

 

 

         Hawkinsville  

      Excessivly Rare         

 

 

 

       Pay in CSA $$$$                                   

Serial # 133. Dated June 1, 1862. Grading service holder incorrectly states July 1, 1862. "TWO DOLLARS" at top. Small steam ship with bale of cotton on each side. Serial number in red ink followed by handwritten red ink plate "A". "TWO DOLLARS" in panel to far left. Printed upon tan paper. No imprint. Plain back. Incredibly rare. It would appear that O.C. Horne was an agent for the Planter's Bank in Georgia when this note was printed and issued. There is a 25 cent, 50 cent and $1 denomination by O. C. Horne known; although none are as well preserved and problem free as this example. Such issues are so rare that very little is known about them. We do know that Hawkinsville is the Pulaski County seat. It's 2010 population was around 4,800. Hawkinsville is located southeast of Macon, GA. O.C. Horne joined Company "F" of the 22nd Battalion, Georgia Calvary on August 6, 1863 at Hawkinsville. They came to be known as the "Georgia Rangers of Pulaski County". It is truly hard to believe that a piece such as this survived at all; much less in the unimpaired, immaculate state it currently exists. Payable in Confederate notes. A most desirable piece and as stated, beyond rare. Opportunities to acquire a note such as this present themselves perhaps once per generation. Someone could offer me a million dollars to locate another and I could not do so. Were this a coin or Federal note of equal rarity and quality, it's value would, without question, be somewhere in six figure range. I could go on forever about this amazing piece of history. Simply incredible.

PCGS VERY    

FINE 25

 $995  

Reverse

    GA  $  5

  Insurance Bank of

     Columbus

 

    115 G 20

 

  September, 1837

 

      Macon

 

 HAXBY PLATE

      NOTE

Serial # 508. Dated September 7, 1837; or so it says on the PCGS holder. It is this writers opinion that the date is September 7, 1851. Eagle sets atop shield holding wheat stalk in one talon. Plain back. Excessively rare; with perhaps one known survivor besides this note. Much mystery surrounds this issue and subsequent cataloging of it. It seems as though catalogers have "taken the easy way out". All issues from this bank; save for the $5 note, are listed as SENC (Surviving Example Not Confirmed) in Haxby. Since the publication of Haxby, a few "special proofs" have surfaced; although a "special proof" could have been printed 20 years ago. This exact note is plated in Haxby on page 261 and given an astronomical value for the time of $200 in very fine condition. This would equate to a value of at least $1,500-$2,000 today. Georgia produced a vast number of obsoletes and it is quite possible that the authors provided the wrong date of closure for this bank. The bank's beginnings were in the 1830's. A note ripe for research with not enough space here to adequately describe the possible scenario surrounding this intriguing issue. A not uncommon situation with some ink feathering at the end of Read's signature for President to the right; although no burn or bleed. He left his quill pen down a second or so too long. Simply a fascinating note which also happens to be plated for posterity in Haxby. Quite desirable and a tremendous research opportunity for the ardent obsolete collector. Incredibly rare.

PCGS

Very Fine 20

 

 

 

 

Haxby Plate

     Note

 

 

 

My grade:

Fine+

 $495  

Reverse

    GA  $  5

   Manufacturers

       Bank

    200 G24a

  May 1, 1862

 

 

       Macon

 

PCGS AU 58 PPQ

Serial # 1808. "18" engraved. Blue ink date of May 1, 1862. Central vignette of Justice draped in American flag sitting atop an eagle. Portrait of George M. Troop to lower left. Georgia State seal to lower right. Heavy green lathe work overprint. Plain back. Simply an immaculate example of this 1862, Civil War, Macon issue. A scan can by no means do this note justice; as the complexity of the design and incredible lathe work cannot be adequately illustrated. Many are the times wherein a choice almost uncirculated note bears much more eye appeal than a technically uncirculated example which is trimmed into the frame line or has part of it missing. Here, we have just such a scenario. The note here offered is perfectly trimmed, bright, clean and as fresh as they come. One may readily ascertain that the Board of Directors of the Manufacturers bank spared no expense when it came to the cost of printing their notes. The amount of green ink utilized on this note is amazing; as is the complex engraving and lathe work. A true work of art if there ever was one and quite illustrative of why these wonderful notes are collected and so highly sought after. The days of acquiring such a majestic numismatic treasure such as this for the sum asked are numbered. Were this piece a coin or Federal note of equal rarity and quality; it's cost would be many multiples of this example. A magnificent obsolete note and a classic product of the American Bank Note Company of New York; the finest printers and engravers of the day. Splendid.

PCGS

AU 58

PPQ

"Premium Paper Quality"

 $395  

Reverse

   GA  $ 5

   Bank of Morgan

      235 G8A

    May 1, 1857

        Morgan

Serial # 3311. Brown ink date of May 1, 1857. Herd of wild stallions running depicted in center. Young girl to lower right. Vivid red "FIVE" overprint. Plain back. A choice example of this ever popular and highly collectible issue. Dead, solid perfect trim with no ink bleed or burn. All Bank of Morgan notes are printed upon an "off white" paper which is very thin. Consequently; this issue was subject to ink bleeding through the paper, especially given the acidic ink used nearly 160 years ago. This note is the exception to that rule. Bright, legible signatures and serial number. It is indeed amazing that one can locate a 157 year old bank note which remains in this pristine state of preservation. Crackling crisp and as fresh as the day it was printed. Notes such as this simply will not be available in the coming years.

CHOICE

   CU

 $425  

Reverse

    GA  $  5

   Bank of Morgan

      235 G8A

    May 1, 1857

        Morgan

 

 

 

 

     PMG GEM UNC 65             

              EPQ               

Serial # 3260. Dated May 1, 1857. Same vignettes as above. Every bit as nice as the serial # 3311 note offered above; although this one is graded by PMG. As tough as the grading services are on any obsolete or Confederate note, I am surprised to see the EPQ or Exceptional Paper Quality designation. Fully issued obsolete notes which make the grading services "65" grade are much tougher to locate than one might think. From a grading perspective; the grading services hold these hand issued, hand trimmed, 160 year old notes to the same standard as a modern, machine cut one dollar U.S. bill which you could obtain at your local bank today. Not exceedingly rare, as are most on this list; although not common either. Extremely scarce this nice. Tough to find any issued obsolete in a Gem New 65 holder. Can't recall seeing another from the Bank of Morgan.

PMG

GEM

UNCIRCULATED

65

 

EPQ

 

Exceptional

Paper

Quality

 $495  

Reverse

    GA  $ 50

   Bank of Morgan

      235 G 18A

    May 1, 1857

        Morgan

 

        PROOF      

No serial number, proof. Punch cancelled; as all proofs are. Central vignette of locomotive arriving at station. Woman with scythe holding grain at lower right. Wagon with rider talking with slaves to lower left. Ornate "L" and "50" counters. Red "50" overprint. Plain Back. Red "Property of American Bank Note Company" stamp. Simply a magnificent example of this very scarce Georgia issue. Bright white, spotless and totally problem free. A wonderful series to collect; with the $50 note being the highest denomination produced. Seldom seen in this day and time and simply not available, issued or proof. A gorgeous proof from this very popular Georgia bank.

CHOICE

UNCIRCULATED

PROOF

 $995  

Reverse
Pic 2

   GA  $ 10

North Western Bank

      of Georgia

    245 G8A

    October 1, 1861

     Ringgold 

  

        SCARCE         

 

 

     PCGS VF 20 PPQ             

Serial # 1472. Dated October 1, 1861. George Washington to mid left with an Indian gazing over a small community to the lower left. Outlined "10". Much, much more scarce than the $20 note on this Calhoun County bank which was located in Northern Georgia near present day Dalton. Amazingly high quality bank note paper was used in the printing of this issue. One may rest assured that the cost of producing this note, along with the $20, was many multiples of a black and white piece. The extra ink required was extremely expensive and the primary reason most banks opted for notes which bore little color. While the $5 note is seen with regularity, the $20 is not. The $10 note here offered is several multiples more scarce than the $20 issue and very seldom seen in any grade. A quality obsolete and a very scarce one at that. Quite unusual for any obsolete at mid grade to earn the "PPQ" or Premium Quality Paper moniker. The first $10 issue from this bank I have seen in years.

PCGS

VF 20 PPQ

My grade

 Fine+

  SOLD

 

Reverse

   GA  $  5

North Western Bank

      of Georgia               

      245 G 6A                                                                      Ringgold                           

    Battle of Bunker Hill   

         May, 1858            

Serial # 6608. Dated May 4, 1858. Revolutionary battle scene from the battle of Bunker Hill at top left. George Washington to lower right. Large red "V" overprint. Far and away above average for the issue with jumbo margins all the way around. One pinhole at the lower right front. Superb eye appeal. Very crisp and problem free.

Choice Fine+

 

Mkt

Grade:

VF-35

 $150  

Reverse

   GA  $ 1    Timber Cutter's

        Bank

 

     335- G2 PROOF

   Savannah 185_

 

PCGS VERY CHOICE NEW

             64

 

 

 

 

    Gorgeous Proof

   Excessively Rare

No serial number....proof. Hole punch cancelled, as 99.99% of all proofs are. Amazing, vivid central vignette of overseer and workers scaling trees. Sailor seated to lower right and slave carrying a basket of freshly picked cotton to lower left. Incredibly sharp detail and as bight white as they come. Exceptionally well inked with resulting superb clarity and contrast. Extremely rare and thought to be produced in proof only. Listed as SENC (Surviving Example Not Confirmed) in Haxby and assigned a rarity rating of 2 known in Bowers later work. I assume Bowers refers to issued notes; although to my knowledge, none are known. It is quite likely that the Directors of the Timber Cutters Bank chose the $1 denomination which bears the red "ONE" overprint over this one, which lacks the red "ONE". Irregardless, an incredibly rare and choice piece. The engravers talent and skill is observed at it's finest upon this pristine work of art. Without question, one of the most appealing and attractive black and white proofs extant. Were this piece a Federal note or coin of equal rarity and quality; it's price would be astronomical. Not sure why this piece grades only 64. I can't imagine it getting any better than this. An opportunity to acquire an extremely rare piece which bears eye appeal beyond description.

PROOF

 

PCGS Very Choice New 64.

PPQ

 

 

Premium

Paper

Quality

 $1295  

Reverse
Pic 2

  GA  $ 5

Bank of Commerce

 

     UNL/Haxby

 

    Savannah

 

 

 

      PROOF

 

 

 

PCGS GEM NEW

         66 PPQ

No serial number, proof mounted on Card stock. Central vignette of Justice holding pole, kneeling and soldier standing between Georgia State Coat of Arms. Young girl within oval to lower left. Red "Property of American Bank Note Company" stamp on back of card stock. Similar to GA-275-G 6b and G6c in Haxby; save for no red "FIVE" overprint. Simply an incredible grade for any obsolete proof; much less a note that was unknown to Haxby in 1989. As clean, bright and fresh as one could ever hope for. A true rarity which just so happens to be preserved in surreal condition. Just because this or any other note is a proof is no guarantee that they will remain in this lofty state of preservation after some 160 years. Sheets got wet, were as likely to fall upon the floor as not, got dirty and were subject to all sorts of other issues. To locate a note which Haxby could not, and which remains this well preserved is indeed a feat unto itself. Quality and rarity; an unbeatable combination.

PCGS Gem New

     66  PPQ

 

Premium

Paper

Quality

 $975  

Reverse

  GA

 

 

 

 

 $100

    Farmers & Mechanics Bank

 

          290 G 14a

      Savannah 1860

    Superb color

 

Serial # 402. A delightful, high denomination product of the renowned American Bank Note Company. Flawless and extremely hard to find. Some slight discoloration from counting to the right front. A gorgeous piece and as nice as they come. None of these are known above VF. Choice trim and totally problem free. Incredible eye appeal.

CHOICE

    VF

 $650  

Reverse

   GA  $100

Farmers & Mechanics Bank

          

         290 G 14a

  Savannah 1860

 

 

PMG Very Fine 25

Serial # 850. Printed date of June 1, 1860. Another lovely example of this high denomination, American Bank Note Company note from Georgia. Superb color and eye appeal. Not as easy to locate as one might think; as these usually have problems of some sort. Typical light counting is barely detectable at the front right. I attempted to provide a larger scan of the back. There are no negative remarks or notations by PMG. Nice and getting much, much tougher to locate.

PMG VF 25

 

My

Grade:

Choice Fine

 $525  

Reverse

   GA  $ 50

Farmers & Mechanics Bank            

       290 G 12a

   Savannah 1860

 

 Incredible Color

Serial # 817. Engraved date of June 1, 1860. Central vignette of sailor with anchor. Georgia Coat of Arms to lower right. Plain back. An amazing example of engraving and color produced by the American Bank Note Company of New York. Perfect trim, brilliant, vivid color and as clean as one could ever hope for. Two tiny pinholes are noted for accuracies sake. Notes such as this one and the note above are rapidly disappearing. Very reminiscent of obsolete notes that were once available and no longer are. No dirt, stains, chinks or other problems. Simply a gorgeous  obsolete with breathtaking eye appeal. A superb, high quality piece which would favorably grace the very finest of collections. I am continually amazed that one can attend the largest of shows and not see a single obsolete of this caliber in this day and time.

CHOICE

    VF+

 

MKT:

 XF

 $675  

Reverse

  GA  $ 20

Farmers & Mechanics

           Bank              

    290 G 10a

   Savannah 1860

 PMG Very Fine 25

Serial # 1615. Printed date of June 1, 1860. George Troup within oval at center. Cupid at upper left and right. Sailors to lower left and woman to lower right. Plain back. A splendid example of the issue. It is readily apparent that the board of directors of the Farmers and Mechanics Bank in Savannah made the decision to spare no expense with regard to beauty and quality of their bank notes. The cost of printing these issues in color was many multiples of a black and white note of the era. A lovely set indeed and this note is no exception. Great trim and wonderful eye appeal.

PMG VF 25

 

 

 

My

Grade:

Choice Fine

  SOLD

 

Reverse

  GA  $  10

Farmers & Mechanics Bank         

      290 G 8a 1860

 

PCGS CHOICE NEW 63       

             PPQ

   

 

         Incredible Color                                 

 

 

      Savannah 1860               

Serial # 4614. Printed date of June 1, 1860. Central vignette of cattle by stream. Bust of John C. Calhoun in oval to lower right. Maiden to lower left. Another beautiful creation of the American Bank Note Company of New York. Absolutely Choice. There do exist some obsolete bank notes that are somehwat available in Choice New or Uncirculated condition. The Farmers & Mechanics Bank of Savannah is NOT one of them. The survival of any F&M bank note in this state of preservation is simply by random chance. In fact, this is the only denomination I have ever had the pleasure of offering  which was remotely near this grade. This note is fully issued and is not a remainder. One could look for the next 40 years and fail to encounter an issue upon this bank of the qualiber offered here.  Not an extremely rare bank; although excessively rare in this condition. Superb color and amazing eye appeal. The type of note that one seldom has an opportunity to acquire.

PCGS CHOICE

 NEW 63  PPQ     

 

 

Premium

Paper

Quality

 $675  

Reverse
Pic 2

  GA  $ 10

  Farmers & Mechanics              Bank

   290 G 8a-Proof

   Savannah 1860

 

 

  Stunning Color

       Proof

 

 

 

 

 

 

 PCGS CHOICE

     NEW 63

No serial Number. Proof. Central vignette of cattle by stream. Bust of John C. Calhoun in oval to lower right. Maiden to lower left. Proof on India paper. A breathtaking proof if there ever was one. Incredible color and a most accurate portrayal of the amazing work of the American Bank Note Company. The grading services are new at grading obsolete proofs and I am not sure how they derive their numbers once a certain level is attained. I would imagine this incredible note is assigned a 63 due to the lack of machine precision trim. Never mind that these proofs were hand trimmed and are over 160 years old. Not to fault the grading services; however, I still find it difficult to imagine that a piece from this era; manufactured in the manner it was, is held to the same "trim" standards as a 2015 machine cut Federal Reserve note. It makes absolutely no sense to me. We see no problems which are sometimes encountered upon an obsolete proof; such as tears at the perforations or stains. All proofs bear Hole Punch Cancels. The HOC's are well rounded and sharp. One of the finest color proofs one could ever hope to locate and a Southern proof at that. Bright, clean and simply astonishing eye appeal. The day will come when such a price for a rare work of art such as this will seem ludicrous. This has occurred throughout the collecting of old paper money and will not abate now. Color beyond description and a proof which would enhance the very finest of collections; anywhere.

CHOICE

CU PROOF

 

 

PCGS CHOICE

  NEW 63

 $3850  

Reverse

   GA  $ 5

   Farmers &

Mechanics Bank

   290 G-6a

 

  Savannah 1860

 

 

Serial # 3855. Printed date of June 1st 1860. Some very light foxing may be observed in two small areas. Many claim this note to be the most beautiful obsolete bank note ever printed. It is indeed difficult to argue with. The owners of this bank spared no expense when it came to producing their notes. The extra ink required to provide this much color would have cost 10 to 20 times the amount to produce a black and white note. A very beautiful series of notes to collect indeed. While still available on occasion today; this series will soon become impossible to put together with all notes being bright, clean and problem free.  FINE  $175  

Reverse

  GA  $ 5      Farmers &

   Mechanics Bank

      290 G-6a

 

  Savannah 1860                                   

          

 

 

                                               PCGS Very Fine 30            

 

 

 

 

     Incredible color

Serial # 4352. Printed date of June 1, 1860. "Liberty" statue which sets atop the U.S. Capitol building at center. Young girl to left and young boy to right. Large, red "5" protectors, left and right. Plain back. Blazing color is present; just as the day the note was printed 157 years ago. This is one of the very, very few notes I have ever seen which I think the grading service under graded. In fact, it is the only note on this website which I think has been under graded by PCGS or PMG. I would expect this amazing piece to be housed in at least an XF-45 holder; if not higher. There exist no flaws of any kind and I would be willing to venture that if one could take the note out of this piece of plastic, it would be as crackling crisp as a Gem CU note. The note could not have circulated to the very fine level and retain the stunning, totally original color. I am not saying the note is Choice CU; however, it is much nicer than a very fine 30. This is the very reason I bought it. Obsolete bank notes bearing the incredible eye appeal this note possess are extremely scarce. From the famous Eric P. Newman collection and the work of the American Bank Note Company. Irregardless, a note which many argue is one of the most beautiful obsoletes printed; anywhere. If you seek a breathtaking example, here is your opportunity.

PCGS VERY

   FINE 30

 

 

My Grade:

Extremely Fine

 $375  

Reverse

  GA  $ 5

   Farmers &

Mechanics Bank

     290 G-6a

 

  Savannah 1860

 

 

 

 

 

Surreal Color Proof

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PCGS VERY CHOICE                NEW  64

  Apparent? NO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The Most Beautiful

  Obsolete Printed?

 

 

 

 

 

No serial number. Proof. "Liberty" statue which is atop U.S. Capitol building at center. Young girl to left and young boy to right. Large, red "5" protectors, left and right. Plain back. Hole punch cancelled, as 99.99% of all proofs are. A wonderful example of an obsolete bank note which many, many collectors claim to be the most beautiful of all obsoletes extant. While there are many beautiful obsoletes; this note certainly has to rank among the most attractive, appealing and desirable. Words simply cannot describe this work of art. A small speck of period ink from the press is visible at the upper right margin and as made. Were it a problem, one can count on the fact that PCGS would have called it out. While PCGS grades this note Very Choice New 64 with minor mounting remnants on back; I respectfully disagree. There are no mounting remnants upon the back of this note! I have black lighted the note, looked at it under very high magnification and brilliant light. I have had the opportunity to observe professional removal of mounting many, many times. Absolutely nothing has been removed from this piece. This note is printed upon very thin India paper. Even high quality bank note paper was not of the same quality of that bank note paper used today....much less India paper which was placed into a steel press. If the young folks at the grading serves see anything that looks odd to them or that they are unsure of, they say "mounting remnants" or "foreign substance". Often times; this is merited. I have been handling obsolete proofs for over 40 years and can assure you, there are no mounting remnants upon this note. I have included a closer view of the back in "pic 2" so that you can get a better look. I would ask that you compare the back of this note to the back of the $10 Farmers and Mechanics proof note above. In reality; it makes no difference, as nothing diminishes the eye appeal and desirability of this amazing piece of history. An extremely rare opportunity to acquire one of the most desirable obsolete bank notes in existence. Simply stunning and quite hard to believe that such a prize remains available for the cost of many semi-tough CSA notes. Believe me; it won't stay that way. The highlight of most any collection and an incredible piece which one never tires of looking upon.

PCGS VERY

CHOICE NEW 64

PROOF

 

Apparent-mounting

 

No mounting

 $4150  

Reverse
Pic 2

    GA  $  1

   Farmers &

Mechanics Bank

   290 G-2a

 

  Savannah 1860

PMG VF 30 EPQ

 

 Gorgeous Note

Serial # 3076. Printed date of June 1, 1860. Liberty to right. Two maidens seated at upper left. Stunning red "1" overprint with "1" on dies, upper right and lower left. One of the nicest low denomination notes one is likely to encounter upon this bank. As lower denomination notes tended to circulate more; they are much, much more difficult to locate problem free. One dollar was a good sum of money in 1860 and this sum was extensively used in day to day commerce. Extremely rare to see the EPQ (Exceptional Paper Quality) designation upon any low denomination obsolete. A stunning note and excessively tough to locate as splendid as this example. PMG VF 30 EPQ  $350  

Reverse

   GA  $100

   Marine Bank

     of Georgia

    295 G 18A

     Savannah

 

 PMG Very Fine 25

 

    CHERRY RED

No serial #, remainder. Plate position "B". Large red "C" protector in center with vivid, bright red design throughout. Neptune overlooks ships at sea to right. Plain back. Simply a breathtaking piece from this very short lived Savannah, Georgia bank. In addition, another classic illustration as to why the American Bank Note Company was considered the premier printer and engraver of bank notes during the 1850's and after. Even though this piece is not issued; it is extremely rare. One would be fortunate to see one of these every eight to ten years. No genuinely issued $100 examples are known to exist, nor does Haxby illustrate any note from this bank issued above the $20 denomination. I have serious reservations that any were issued. Very few survive as remainders. The beauty this note emanates represents what collecting obsolete bank notes is all about. An incredible note with eye appeal beyond description coupled with coinciding rarity.

PMG

Very Fine 25

 $895  

Reverse

   GA  5 Cents  Planters Bank of

         the

  State of Georgia

     320-G 90

    Savannah

       1861

 

 

    Nonexistent

   In High Grade

  Extremely Rare

Serial # 997 in red ink. Central vignette of horses feeding. Engraved date of December 2, 1861. Printed upon the back of a Georgia Bond. Crackling crisp and fresh. Having never seen the market until now, this small denomination note is excessively rare. This small denomination note from the Planters Bank of the State of Georgia is listed in Haxby as SENC (seen but not confirmed) with no value listed in high grade. Obviously put away since the Civil War, this note saw no use whatsoever. No folds, pinholes or problems of any kind. Most unusual for a small denomination note such as this. One, totally non-distracting contemporary ink spot is noted upon the back for accuracies sake. Hand signed in brown ink for President with no ink bleed or burn. I would imagine a lot of collectors have been looking for one of these for quite some time. I feel fortunate to be in a position to offer an example and a pristine one at that.

CHOICE

    CU

 $395

 

 

 

Reverse

   GA  $ 20

Merchants and Planters Bank

 

       315-G 12b

 

 

 

        Savannah

     June 11, 1860

 

 

 

 

 

 

        GEM CU

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Blazing Red Color

Serial # 323. Printed date of June 1, 1860; changed to "11 June, 1860". Central vignette of Justice and Agriculture seated next to shield. Man on horseback to lower left. Blacksmith or miner seated to lower right. Incredible red "20" and "TWENTY" protectors and medallions. Date changed by adding "11" just in front of June. The first time I have noticed this occurrence. Plain back. A breathtakingly beautiful product of the American Bank Note Company. A rare glimpse back into time and a look at exactly how such a note appeared the very day it was trimmed from the sheet. Stunning, with razor sharp corners and no hint of a fold. Bright, fresh and cracking crisp. There have been no "hoards" of this issue discovered and the notes survival in this immaculate state of preservation is by mere happenstance. While not a particularly rare note; one may rest assured an example will very, very rarely be encountered this well preserved. We are viewing a 160+ year old paper item; not a metal coin. Just as with collectors from generations past; this is the type of note which collectors in the future will gaze upon with amazement and wonder how it was ever acquired. No ink bleed or problems of any kind or character. Incredible eye appeal and a true sight to behold. Quality and eye appeal which one can never go wrong with.

GEM

UNCIRCULATED

 $575  

Reverse

    GA  $  1

        Henley & Mitchell                           Summerville       

              UNL

 

 

     Only Known $1 Note   

 

 

 

 

       PCGS Very Fine 30    

   

 

 

      1862 - Pay CSA $$$$ 

Serial # 347. Dated August 1, 1862. An incredibly well preserved example of this Civil War era merchant scrip from Northwest Georgia. In 1860, Summerville's population was 350. Like many Southern towns, the following census (1870) saw a 20% decrease in the population due to men lost in the War between the States. Offered here is a piece of Civil War scrip which remains in a state of preservation which defies the imagination. Simply incredible. Payable in "Confederate or Current Bank Notes". The only know surviving example of the $1.00 denomination from Henly & Mitchell and what an amazing example it is. To my knowledge, there is a 50 cent piece known; although it is very condition challenged. Totally flawless and a piece which one could never go wrong acquiring. Beyond rare.

PCGS Very Fine

           30             

 $1275  

Reverse

    GA  25 Cents

        Waynesborough                       William Germain                              UNL                        

 

 

 

 

   MAY 28, 1816         

 

 

 

 

   PCGS Very Fine 35             

 

 

 

 

   Waynesborough, GA            

 

No serial number. Dated May 28, 1816. About as early as one will ever encounter a piece of Southern merchant scrip. Waynesborough was authorized by an act of July 31, 1793 of the legislature at Macon. However; the town itself was not incorporated until December 1, 1812. The county seat of Burke County, one of the original counties of Georgia. It is truly difficult to grasp what the area was like over 200 years ago; which is how old this magnificent piece of history is. James Madison was President of the United States. Known as Waynesboro today and considered part of the Macon metropolitan area. A superb research project for someone. William Germain obviously ran a store in 1816 in Waynesborough; at best a very remote and likely dangerous location. It is near inconceivable that a piece of paper such as this wonderful piece of merchant scrip could survive in the incredible condition it is for over 200 years. By far the finest early piece of Southern merchant scrip I have ever laid eyes upon. Flawless; with not one single pinhole, margin chink or other distraction. The word rare is woefully insufficient to describe this amazing piece of Georgia history. A true "opportunity" note if there ever was one.

PCGS Very Fine

         35                 

  SOLD

 

Reverse


 

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