Inventory - Miscellaneous Obsoletes and Southern States - Florida:
 

Below are my current offerings in Florida. Visit the Terms page to order.


 

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Abbreviation Key


      All notes in stock unless otherwise indicated. Hundreds more notes from all Southern States to be added as time permits. If you don't see it; please feel free to ask. Odds are I have it. 99% of my inventory is NOT listed on the Web Site.    

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 FL             FLORIDA
   FL  $ 50

 

 TALLAHASSEE

  State of Florida

      Cr-3

      1861

 

     PMG GEM

 Uncirculated 65

       EPQ

Serial # 2798.  Printed date of October 10, 1861. Simply a superb example of this Hoyer & Ludwig $50 Florida issue. Unlike the State of Florida notes with color; which begin with Criswell 15, this note and the white $100, $20, $10, $5, $3, $2 and $1 (Cr-2 thru Cr-14) were lithograph printings. This means that the notes were printed with stone plates rather than steel engraved plates utilized by Keatinge & Ball upon those Florida State notes of color. Rarely do we see a Hoyer & Ludwig note attain the lofty grade of Gem Uncirculated. These issues were prone to ink bleed at the signatures, yellowing or foxing of the paper and not printed with the strength of steel plates; thus producing embossing. The note here offered is indeed an exception to the rule with regard to lithographs, as it retains it's snow white color. No ink bleed or burn and incredibly well inked. Choice trim with amazing clarity and contrast. One will encounter a good many more steel engraved Florida notes in high grade than a note such as this one. A true prize that presents with exceptional quality and at this grade; solid rarity. Locating another in this lofty state of preservation would indeed be a difficult task.

PMG

GEM

UNC 65

Exceptional

Paper

Quality

 $675

 

 

Reverse

   FL  $ 50  TALLAHASSEE

  State of Florida

      Cr-3A

 

 

 

INVERTED FIFTY

 

        1861

Serial # 4491. Central vignette of Ceres seated, facing right. "L" in counter left and right top with "50" in round, scalloped counter; left and right bottom. Plain back. A magnificent example of this very scare 1861 Florida State issue. Clean, fresh and bright with not one single pinhole. The frequent problem of ink bleed, burn and run at C.H. Austin's signature for Treasurer (lower left) is pleasingly absent from this note. The frequently seen ink bleed at Austin's signature has been the ruin of a good many Florida State issues. Light secretarial signature of Governor John Milton to right. A very scare Florida error, rated an R-9 in Hugh Shull's "Guide Book of Southern States Currency". The right "Fifty" just below the word "FLORIDA" is inverted. Such a mistake would have been rapidly spotted and the plate retired. This was exactly what occurred and few of these survive today; much less in this pristine state of preservation. Most often, the 1861 Florida issues are found foxed, spotted or with some sort of stain or the like somewhere on the body of the note. Not so here; as this note is as crisp and new as any bank note that you could acquire at your local bank today. Four full frame lines with no folds provide a CH CU grade...nearly gem. They just don't come any nicer than this. A gorgeous, highly desirable and totally problem free Civil War Florida piece.  CH CU  $675

 

 

Reverse
Pic 2

  FL

 

 

 

 $ 20  TALLAHASSEE

  State of Florida

       Cr-4

       1861

Serial # 3047. Ceres facing right, as on all 1861 State of Florida issues by H&L save for the $1,$2 and $3. Exceptionally bright and clean for this issue. Cut just a tiny fraction tight at the far upper left front. Superb clarity and contrast; which are indeed tough to locate with any H&L Florida issue. Not one single problem. An extremely nice piece and ever tougher to locate in this day and time. Far above average.    VF+  $295

 

 

Reverse

 FL

 

 

 

 

 

 $ 3  TALLAHASSEE

  State of Florida

       Cr-7A

       1861

Serial # 3281 in red ink. Limited to a print run of a mere 4,454 notes; the $3 1861 State of Florida note is one tough note. These were "workhorse" notes. The only distraction I see with this note is a small ink splatter at the upper left front, just to the left of Perry's signature. You will not find one of these low denomination notes in high grade. A very small ding at the upper right front. This example possesses four signatures on the front; which is most unusual. Secretarial signature of Governor John Milton. Not one pinhole and believe me, an extremely nice example of this very tough Florida issue. A CSA T-8 in reverse if you will.    F/VF  $325

 

 

Reverse

    FL

 

 

 

 $ 100  TALLAHASSEE

  State of Florida

       Cr-10    1862

Serial # 1065. Cut just a tick tight at the lower left corner from the front. A somewhat crude product of Hoyer & Ludwig; however, I am quite sure it served it's purpose during Civil War Florida. No folds, pinholes or ink issues. Much tougher than one might think. Not toned like so many of these are. Uncirculated  $495

 

 

Reverse

   FL 

 

 

 

 $ 100  TALLAHASSEE

  State of Florida

       Cr-10

       1862

 Transitional Note

Serial # 1064 and consecutive to the note above. Fully framed with superb eye appeal. No problems whatsoever. This note vividly illustrates the transition from Cr 10 to Cr 10A. There is no cross bar at the left plate letter "H". The cross bar at the right plate letter "H" is light and faded. A light "bend" which is not strong enough to call a fold present in the middle. A very pleasing example of this most attractive and unusual issue.

CHOICE

     AU+

 $550

 

 

Reverse

   FL 

 

 

 $ 100  TALLAHASSEE

  State of Florida

       Cr-10A

       1862

Serial # 137. A splendid example of this R-9 issue. Fully framed with no ink bleed or burn which is so common with these Hoyer and Ludwig issues. There is no cross bar in either plater letter "H". Quite scarce. Clean, bright and crackling crisp. 3 light folds or so. Superb eye appeal.

CHOICE

     XF

 $575

 

 

Reverse

  FL  $   2  TALLAHASSEE

  State of Florida

       Cr-18

        1863

     PMG GEM            

UNCIRCULATED 65

         EPQ                     

   CHOICE NOTE

Serial # 11735. Printed date of March 1, 1863. Central vignette of locomotive rounding curve. Oval seal to upper left containing Ceres and Justice. "2" on die to upper right. Vignette of Ceres to lower left and Indian maiden to lower right. Very strong red "TWO" overprint. Plain back. A very tough low denomination note to locate in a Gem Uncirculated 65 grading service holder. These are few and far between. Many of the $2.00 denomination issues of this type are found badly toned. Not so with this example. Signed by then Florida Governor John Milton to the lower right. A gem that one cannot go wrong with and as stated, extremely difficult at the 65 level. Choice eye appeal and a gorgeous note.

     PMG GEM      

UNCIRCULATED

       65 EPQ          

 

 

 

EXCEPTIONAL

PAPER

QUALITY

  SOLD

 

Reverse
Pic 2

  FL  $  2  TALLAHASSEE

  State of Florida

       Cr-18

        1863

 

 

 

 

 

PCGS Very Choice

       New 64

Serial # 11766. Printed date of March 1, 1863. Striking central vignette of locomotive rounding curve. Oval seal to upper left containing Ceres and Justice. "2" on die to upper right. Vignette of Ceres to lower left and Indian maiden to lower right. Very strong red "TWO" overprint. Plain back. No watermark, as is the norm with this issue. A superb example of this 1863 State of Florida issue authorized by legislative act enacted by the State on December 13, 1862. Bright, well inked red "TWO" overprint. The work of Keatinge & Ball; printers and engravers of a number of Confederate Treasury notes. The example offered here is immaculate. Vivid brown ink serial numbers and signatures (4). Amazing clarity and detail. Once more; as an "old timer", I am confused by the grade of Very Choice New 64. The note is superbly trimmed in my humble opinion. Perhaps if one were to place a ruler on the edges of the note, there may be a 1/20th of an inch more selvage in one place than another. I do not know. Irregardless of the "number" assigned to this amazing note, one would be hard pressed to locate a better example. A wonderful piece of American history bearing incredible eye appeal.

PCGS Very

Choice New

     64

 $595  

Reverse

   FL

 

 

 

 

  50 Cents  TALLAHASSEE

  State of Florida

       Cr-22B

       1863

No serial #. One signature space; although four signatures present. Printed upon the back of a $500,000 Florida Bond! Holy smoke! Secretarial signature of Governor Milton. Old, crudely repaired tear at left center front. The "one signature" space notes were originally not authorized by the Governor and are usually printed upon the backs on Florida notes, bonds or the like. Florida fractional notes are more scare than the same fractionals from North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama and the like. A neat Florida piece. Net: Fine  $ 80

  

 

Reverse

   FL

 

 

  25 Cents  TALLAHASSEE

  State of Florida

       Cr-24

       1863

No serial number. Two signature spaces; although signed by four different people. Although not visible in the scan; the lettering and "TWENTY FIVE" present incredible embossing upon the back. Superb trim. Wonderful color and a beautiful Florida piece. A small fold at the lower right corner from the back prevents a Gem CU grade. Still; a beauty.

CHOICE

   AU+

 $85

 

 

Reverse

   FL

 

 

  10 Cents  TALLAHASSEE

  State of Florida

       Cr-28

       1863

No serial number. Two signature spaces; with four different signers. Choice color. Crackling crisp and fresh. About as nice as one could want. Cut just a hair tight at the upper left front; otherwise this one is gem. Much tougher than most folks think. Uncirculated+  $ 90

 

 

Reverse

   FL 

 

 

 

  10 Cents  TALLAHASSEE

  State of Florida

       Cr-30A Tough

       1863

No serial number. One signature space. Four different signers. Printed upon the back of Bank of Fernandina notes. Anyone who has ever tried to acquire a Bank of Fernandina note knows how rare and expensive those are. Much more rare than reference books provide. This note was housed in a PMG grading service holder at VF 20 (see pic 2).   An extraordinary Florida note.

FINE

PMG

VF 20

 $275

 

 

Reverse
Pic 2

  FL  $ 10

       Commercial             Bank of Florida            

 

         B-19                 

 

 

 

 December 1,

       1835                                                      Excessively  Rare 

                                                

      Apalachicola

                     

Serial # 658. Plate "B". Dated December 1, 1835. Central vignette of three masted sailing ship. George Washington standing to the right and India standing to the left. Plain back. An extremely rare note which has appeared at auction only one time in the last 50 years.  Very much underrated by Benice. The Bank was approved by the Legislative Council of the Territory of Florida on February 7, 1833, over the Governor's veto. A long and interesting story, the bank's assets were stolen in 1837; although recovered. Most notes upon this bank are unsigned remainders; although the example here offered is guaranteed to be correctly signed and absolutely genuine. Only the signatures of M. Clark for Cashier (lower left) and that of J. C. Maclay as President (lower right) are authentic. This note bears both actual signatures. Printed upon paper as thin as the proverbial "bat's ear". Rice paper thin. Truly hard to believe that such a piece of history survived at all for the  last 183 years in such immaculate condition. Not one single pinhole, chink, or tear and no problems whatsoever. Were this a coin of similar rarity; it's value would be into the stratosphere. A true piece of Americana if there ever was one and hard to believe that it is available to collectors in this day and time - after over 18 decades.

Choice Fine

 

 

MKT

GRADE

 

  VF 25                       

  SOLD  

Reverse

  FL    75     

Cents

  Orange Springs

 

  J. W. Pearson

 

      B 21B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  PCGS FINE 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       1862

No serial number. Dated 1862. Two masted sailing ship in center. Left "75" ; "7" & "5" not aligned. Printed upon back of Orange Springs bond. Thick paper with not one single pinhole. No margin chinks or tears. An R-7 piece, according to Florida author and expert Ron Benice as so published in his excellent work, "Florida Paper Money". This accurately translates into 4-12 known surviving examples in all grades. Based upon my experience, I wholeheartedly agree with Mr. Benice and am inclined to think that he is being conservative. Many such rarities; whether they be from Georgia, Alabama or other locations are often assigned an "apparent" grade by the grading services due to a small edge ding or the like. This designation arises due to the grading services insistence that an excessively rare, 160 year old note which no one had any reason to save, from a very obscure location with perhaps 4 or 5 known survivors, be held to the same grading standards as a modern day bank note available at your local bank today. Further, the "modern day" note was printed upon the finest Crane paper and machine cut. To me, and to advanced collectors, this "apparent" grade is totally meaningless. Relative to great rarities such as this piece, a small imperfection or the like is to be expected. It is the "norm". The fact that the note survived at all is amazing. This is not to say that there do exist situations wherein the designation of "apparent" is not called for. In many cases that designation is warranted and meaningful. It is my humble opinion that the grading services have in many cases simply gone too far with this moniker. It seems that the history behind many great rarities of the paper money world are becoming lost or simply "left behind" by some newer collectors because of the word apparent, "foreign substance" or edge ding. Irregardless, we have no "apparent" designation assigned to this note. A solid piece, with no edge chinks, stains or the like. J. W. Pearson (John William) moved to Orange Springs, near the present day site of Ocala, from South Carolina and there developed a health resort. He also owned several other business interests; although in late May 1862 formed the Ocklawaha Rangers. The Rangers consisted of 125-150 men whose primary function was to protect the St. Johns River and adjacent towns. In May of 1864, Captain Pearson and his men were ordered to join Lee's Army of Northern Virginia and made the 9 day march from the Ocala area to Hanover Junction, Virginia. There Pearson saw his most intense fighting of the Civil War at Cold Harbor in June of 1864. One month later, in August of 1864, Captain Pearson was mortally wounded at Battle of Weldon RR not far from Cold Harbor. He attempted to make the journey home to Orange Springs; although succumbed to his wounds and died at Augusta, Georgia on September 24, 1864. Volumes could be written about this piece and the man who signed it. A successful businessman and Confederate Officer, whose life was claimed by the horrific conflict known as the Civil War. Florida history doesn't get any better than this. Problem free, bearing a very vivid signature of J. W. Pearson. The day will soon be upon us when pieces such as this one may only be seen in institutions or museums. An incredibly rare piece of Americana and worthy of any collection or museum.

PCGS

Fine 12

 

 

 

My Grade:

Fine, Choice

 $2850

  

 

Reverse

   FL  $   5

     Bank of

 West  Florida

       B-12

  "Apalachicola"

        1832

 

 

 

 

 

PCGS VF 25 PPQ

Serial # 1879. Dated November 3, 1832. Central vignette of Justice holding scales standing beside shield and eagle. Woman standing to left and cattle to right. Indian in canoe at bottom middle. Plain back. While not considered "rare" in the obsolete note genre; it is truly amazing that a piece of paper which is 183 years old and served as a medium of exchange survives in this state of preservation today. The area deemed "West Florida" was originally formed by the British in 1763 (after several sovereignty changes) and comprised what is known today as the Florida panhandle along with parts of Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. The Southern boundary was the Gulf of Mexico, the Western boundary the Mississippi River and region was bounded on the East by the Apalachicola River. Needless to say, the area is much too steeped in history to do it justice here, as tempting as it is to do so. The colonies of West Florida and East Florida were combined into the Territory of Florida by the U.S. on March 22, 1822. Florida was admitted to the Union and became a State in March of 1845. The note itself is free of any problems whatsoever. Not one single pinhole; thus the most unusual "PPQ" (Premium Paper Quality) designation. The "PPQ" moniker is seldom seen on any obsolete bank note; much less an example that is 183 years old. A splendid note rich in our nation's history with ties to Spain, France and Great Britain.

PCGS

VF 25

PPQ

 $325      

 

 

Reverse
Pic 2

   FL  $ 10  Bank of St. Johns

         B-7

 Jacksonville 1859

 Hunter Shooting

   Deer Vignette

Serial # 455. Dated May 2, 1859. Seldom seen and highly sought after central vignette of hunter shooting deer. Indian to lower left and Florida State seal to lower right. Plain back. Much more elusive than the $5 issue on this bank and an extremely appealing obsolete bank note. Signed by George L. Bryant as Cashier to right and A. M. Reed as President (founder of the bank); the note is also signed by the Comptroller of the State of Florida, Theodore W. Brevard. An old mounting remnant is visible at the lower, mid back; although not distracting. No pinholes, exceptional trim and superb eye appeal. A note which represents the very essence of what collecting these wonderful pieces of history is all about.

CHOICE

FINE

MKT:

VF 30

 $525

 

 

Reverse

    FL  $ 10  Bank of St. Johns

         B-7

 Jacksonville 1859

  

 

 

    PMG VF-20

Serial # 1047. Dated May 2, 1859. Same design and vignettes as above. The central vignette which appears upon this note is one of the most desirable and sought after in the obsolete note arena. As stated above; the $10 issue upon the Bank of Saint Johns in Jacksonville is many multiples more scarce than the more frequently seen $5 issue.  It is indeed near impossible to imagine what Jacksonville, FL was like in 1859. Today; it is the largest city size wise in the State of Florida. This note is a classic example of an obsolete which will soon become totally unavailable or extremely more costly. One just does not see them at large shows with any degree of regularity in this day and time. While PMG grades this note VF 20; I think it more along the lines of a nice fine. Pleasing to the eye with no problems. Believe me, if there were any; they would have been called out by PMG....just as I would.

PMG VF-20

 

 

 

My Grade:

Fine

 $450

  

 

Reverse

   FL

 

 

 

 $  5

  Bank of St. Johns

         B-6B

 Jacksonville 1859

Serial # 2186. Cotton boll in center. American Bank Note Company imprint to left of cotton boll. Locomotive to lower left. State seal to lower right. A far above average example of this highly sought after Florida note. There were just not that many banks in Florida 150-160 years ago, much to the lament of collectors today. A choice example; which I have never seen or heard of in high grade. Totally problem free.

CHOICE

   FINE

 $350

 

 

Reverse


 

Please visit the Terms page to order.

randy@shipleyscurrency.com
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Mooresburg, TN 37811

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