Inventory - Miscellaneous Obsoletes and Southern States - Alabama:
 

Below are my current offerings in Alabama. Visit the Terms page to order.


 

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Abbreviation Key


      All notes in stock unless otherwise indicated. Hundreds more notes from all Southern States to be added as time permits. If you don't see it; please feel free to ask. Odds are I have it. 99% of my inventory is NOT listed on the Web Site.    

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AL          ALABAMA


   AL  $ 5

  State of Alabama

       Cr C22

 

   CAHAWBA

       1821

 

 

 

  PCGS XF 45

 

 

 

 

 

 

        R-10

    5-15 Estimated

       Survive

 

 

 

Serial # 3273. Dated December 18, 1821. Lightly cut cancelled; as all known survivors are  Last digit of printed "1820" crossed out and "1" added to make date 1821. Central depiction of old steamboat. Imprint: "ALLEN & BRICKELL, Printers", in middle of bottom border. Plate "B". Plain back. Simply an incredible piece from the very first days of the creation of the State of Alabama. Cahawba was the first Capitol of Alabama, having been created in 1820. While hard to believe in this day and time, in 1820 the area was total wilderness and bordered upon Indian Territory. Cahawba is today a "ghost town" and any fiscal document emanating from this location is excessively rare. In fact; as noted in Hugh Shull's masterful work upon Southern States Currency (for sale in books section) this note is rated an R-10, with 5-15 estimated survivors; in any grade. Further, Mr. Shull does not even attempt to place a value upon this note and indicates in the "value" section merely "Very Rare". I cannot imagine a nicer, more well preserved 195 year old piece than this one. Immaculate in all respects. Cut cancelled; as all known examples are. Clean, bright and fresh with no stains or pinholes. Original embossing. Truly a miracle of survival in this lofty state of preservation and the type of note that will always remain highly desirable. It would be one thing if we were discussing a coin from this era; however, we are looking at a piece of paper money. The odds of survival between the two are astronomical. I simply cannot envision a more historic piece than this one; a 195 year old note from Alabama's very first, frontier Capitol which is now extinct and a "ghost town". Amazing.

PCGS

Extremely

Fine 45

C/C

 $2750  

Reverse

   AL  $ 5

  State of Alabama

     Cr. C24

 

   CAHAWBA

       1821

 

 

       R-10

   5-10 Estimated

     Survive

 

 

 

 Watermarked

      Paper

 

 

 

  July 10, 1821

Serial # 2014. Very lightly cut cancelled. Dated July 10, 1821. Year of 1821 fully engraved. Central vignette of old steam boat. Imprint of "Allen & Brickell....print" below bottom design and not trimmed off. Plate "B". Signed by Samuel Pickens and made payable to William B. Allen for his services as "the Public Printer". Plain back. One has to actually look for the lone cut cancellation; as it is very, very light and not struck all the way through the paper. Printed upon watermarked paper; the first I have so encountered. While the watermark does not show well in the scan, it is readily visible when viewing the note with an average light source. Unlike any watermark I have ever seen and most likely from England. From the back, the watermark covers the right one third of the note and appears to a partial watermark. I can count 14 tail feathers of what appears to be a bird with the remainder of the watermark headed to the right and off the surface of the note. No mention is made of watermarked paper being utilized in Hugh Shull's work on Southern State Currency. This note is not part of a small run of early Alabama pieces which made an appearance at Heritage auctions a few years back. Irregardless, an incredibly rare note. The inclusion of the imprint is definitely a plus; given it's location. Most often when the imprint is located below the bottom design, it was trimmed off. Not so here. Printed upon thicker paper and no pinholes, tears, chinks or other problems. No repairs or the like. An incredibly rare piece and issued when the area was very close to being a total wilderness.

Very Fine

 

Lightly c/c

 $1950  

Reverse

   AL  $ 10

   State of Alabama

 

       Cr 14

 

 Montgomery 1864

Serial # 4060. Engraved date of January 1, 1864. Central portrait of Alabama Governor Watts. Green "TEN" overprint. Plain back. A very presentable example of this easy to locate issue. Two sheet crimps upon the back; although there are a couple of light folds as well. Faint, but present. Pleasing trim, exceptionally clean and very bright. Most would grade this note almost uncirculated. I think it more along the line of choice extremely fine.

Choice

Extremely

Fine

 $125  

Reverse

   AL  $ 5

  State of Alabama

 

       Cr 15

 

 Montgomery 1864

Serial# 13159. Engraved date of January 1, 1864. Central vignette of "overseer" on horse observing field hands at work. Liberty with pole to lower left. Green "FIVE" overprint. Plain back. Crackling crisp and fresh. Good trim, although somewhat tight at the lower right. Superb eye appeal. Oddly, a vertical fold does not show in the scan. When using a black background; most every single aspect (good or bad) of a note will present itself. On many occasions, the black background causes a note to look unnatural, as the note appears with far more detail than the human eye can see it. The slightest unevenness of the trim is exaggerated, paper imperfections are exaggerated and many, many other elements. Irregardless, this note does in fact possess more than the two or three faint folds one can readily see. A nice looking note nonetheless. No pinholes or problems of any kind or character.

VF+/XF

 

 

 

 

MKT

Grade:

XF-45

 $ 90  

Reverse

    AL  $  5

  State of Alabama

 

       Cr 15

 

 Montgomery 1864

Serial # 13187. Plate "E". Engraved date of January 1, 1864. Central vignette of "overseer" on horse observing field hands at work. Liberty with pole to lower left. Green "FIVE" overprint. Plain back. A choice example of the issue. No folds, snow white paper and flawless. The very small dark area seen at the upper, middle back is a tiny spot of contemporary ink. It is very light in color and a classic example of the graphic detail brought out via a quality scan. Not noticeable at all when viewing the actual note. Strong green overprint. Although common; tougher to locate this nice than one might expect. "Pic 2" is shown to illustrate just how "white" and clean this note is. CU  $135  

Reverse
Pic 2

  AL  $1

Auburn

East AL INS CO.

   R15-9

R-7 1-5 Known

    July, 1862

 

 Serial # 3

Serial # 3.  Listed as an R-7 (1-5 known) in Rosene's work upon Alabama obsoletes; I have no doubt that this rating has held up with regard to the One dollar denomination.The same cannot be said of the $2.00 note. Bearing a highly desirable single digit serial number of "3". Red "ONE" & "1" overprint. The lower left portion of the back is simply folded over, and the entire note is present. Amazingly well preserved with a single pinhole and two tiny margin chinks which are outside the frame lines. Much tougher than most think. A wonderful piece from Auburn, Alabama payable in Confederate Treasury Notes.

CHOICE

  FINE

 

MKT

Grade

   VF+

 $565  

Reverse

   AL  25 Cents

       Eutaw                         A. Jarvis

     R 77-2

 

PCGS Very Fine 35

     Apparent

 

 

   May 10, 1862

 

      Serial # 3

 

 

   Pay CSA $$$

Serial # 3. Handwritten plate "F". Engraved date of May 10, 1862. Old riverboat at top center. Plain back. Rosene knew of this note in his work on Alabama Obsolete Notes and Scrip; and there assigned it rarity 7, or 1-5 known in any grade. It is my opinion that Rosene's rarity ratings have stood the test of time; with this being the only 25 cent denomination I have seen or heard of. One can count the known surviving examples of scrip emitted by A. Jarvis in all denominations on one hand. Of the very few Jarvis examples I have seen over the years, each and every one had problems. Problems or not; excessively rare and the only 25 cent denomination known. Payable in current Bank or Confederate Notes. Eutaw is located in Western Alabama, near the Mississippi State line. The population in 1860 was less than 2,000.....roughly the same as today. An amazing piece of American history. I certainly don't know where one could ever locate another.

PCGS

Very Fine 35 

 

Apparent

Edge and

Internal

Damage

 $695  

Reverse

   AL  $  2

  M. M. Laseter

 

       UNL

 

   CLAYTON

 

   Sept. 20,1862

 

 

 

  Pay CSA $$$

 

  Perhaps Unique

Serial # 2017. Printed date of September 20, 1862. Red "TWO" and "2" overprint. Plain back. An incredibly well preserved example of this denomination which was unknown to Rosene in his work on Alabama Obsolete Notes and Scrip. Only the five cent denomination was known to him. Since Rosene was published, there have been extremely limited appearances of the $1.00 and 50 cent denomination. However, I know of no $2.00 denomination surfacing anywhere. The note is amazing in that it is totally problem free, lacking even one single pinhole. Superb trim with bold, vivid inking and signature. On April 1, 1863; the Alabama legislature outlawed the printing of private scrip. Consequently, we see none issued or dated after this date...from any merchant in the State. The piece here offered is very solid and not the least bit fragile. Payable in Confederate Treasury notes and more rare than an 1804 silver dollar; by far. As stated, the only $2.00 denomination known and missing from the great Walter B. Jones collection.

CHOICE

  FINE

 

 

 

Mkt

Grade:

VF 25-30

 $625  

Reverse

  AL  $  1

Gainesville Ins Co.

  Gainesville

    R-107-3

 

 July 1, 1862

 

 PAY IN CSA $$$

 

 

   R-7 1-5 Known

Serial # 1341. An excessively rare piece from Gainesville, AL. Engraved date of July 1, 1862. Extremely high grade for the type of note that it is. I vehemently disagree with the grade assigned by PMG of Choice Fine 15. Usually found in pieces (if at all), torn, tattered or half there; and now held to the same standard as a 1957 machine cut silver certificate printed upon the finest Crane paper by the grading services. Having gotten that out of the way; we are looking at a very rare piece of Southern History. One or two visible folds; which is surreal for a piece such as this one. No pinholes. Payable in Confederate Treasury Notes and signed by AA. Hamilton. The lower right signature is weak, as it is on the note plated in Rosene. Old style steam locomotive on front. 1-5 are known to exist, with this being the first $1.00 denomination I have ever seen. A wonderful note and most desirable as such. Former Walter Jones collection.

VF++

 

PMG

CHOICE

 FINE 15

  $695

 

Reverse
Pic 2

    AL 50 Cents  May & Lamar   

  Gunthersville

 

  Not 120-3 UNL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payable in CSA $$

       NOT

Alabama Currency

Serial # 78. No Date. Small steamship in center with "50" to right and left. Printed upon blue lined paper. Plain back. In his 1984 work "Alabama Obsolete Notes and Scrip", Walter Rosene lists all May and Lamar scrip with "Alabama Currency"

where you see the words Confederate Currency upon this piece. He depicts a 25 cent note as a representative example, which bears the words "Alabama Currency" in the location stated above. Further, he states at the bottom of the listings for the various denominations "Date: 1862 engraved, for entire issue". As is noted, this piece bears no date. Rosene does refer to the small vignette of a steamship or eagle upon the various denominations and it should be noted that he was unaware of a 75 cent piece at the time. It is my opinion that he was unaware of this variation of the 50 cent scrip note at the time as well. Irregardless, a wonderful and extremely rare note for the Alabama specialist or for any obsolete collector for that matter. An intriguing aspect associated with the piece here offered is shown quite well in "Pic 2". Just beneath the words "Confederate Currency", the next line reads "We will pay the bearer FIFTY CENTS" which is printed. Following "FIFTY CENTS" is written in brown ink. "in Con". This was required as the next line begins with "federate currency". Nothing could so vividly illustrate the very reason collecting these historic pieces of Americana is so interesting and enjoyable. I could go on and on about this piece; however, space nor time allows it. The note is in incredible condition, printed upon thicker paper. No pinholes or unsightly stains. Incredibly rare and simply pure American  history at it's finest.

Choice Very Fine+

   SOLD

 

Reverse
Pic 2

   AL  $ 20

  Bank of Selma

 

    R-292-3

 

 

 August 4, 1859

 

     Selma

 

 

 

 

 Superb Color

  

Serial # 6596. Dated August 4, 1859. Bank title and two young girls at top center. "Wagon load of cotton" vignette to lower right which is similar; although not the same as the CSA T-23. Locomotive at lower left with seal at mid bottom. Plain back. Without question, the Bank of Selma emitted some of the most beautiful obsolete bank notes issued by any Southern bank. The $20 issue is many multiples more rare than the five or ten dollar notes. The note here offered presents the collector with an opportunity to acquire a very scarce, drop dead beautiful, mid grade example of what can be a very, very expensive obsolete. According to Rosene, most all of the Bank's notes were burned by bank President W. M. Smith on April 20, 1865 to prevent them from being captured upon the advancement of Union forces during "Wilson's raid." Perhaps this explains why we see so few $20, $50 and $100 denomination notes in this day and time. Simply amazing color for the grade with eye appeal beyond description. Superb trim and problem free, bearing not a single pinhole. Provided one were fortunate enough to locate a very fine example; it's cost would be astronomical.  The note you see exhibits nothing but honest, even wear. The area at the top left back is not a mount or a scuff and was occasioned during the storage of the note over the last 160 years. It is not a repair or the like. A breathtaking American Bank Note Company creation and a note that one never tires of looking upon. Scarce and extremely desirable.

CHOICE

   FINE

 

 

 

Mkt

Grade:

VF-25

 $875  

Reverse
Pic 2

    AL  $  5

  Bank of Selma

 

    R-292-1

 

 

 January 1, 1862

 

     Selma

 

 

 

  Choice Note

  for the Grade

Serial # 12746. Dated January 1, 1862. Thick paper. Central vignette of riverboat "Selma". "5" on die surrounded by red; left and right. Alabama State seal to lower left. Slave picking cotton to lower right. Bank title in red ink. "5" and "FIVE" red overprint. American Bank Note Company imprint to lower left. Plain back. Simply a choice mid grade example of this beautiful obsolete from the Bank of Selma. Perfect trim, clean with very bold, legible signatures and serial number. Extremely difficult to locate at this grade level this nice and without problems. I have had the rare occasion to observe this issue two or three times within the last 40 years in the grade of Almost Uncirculated. In reality, those notes were not a great deal more attractive than this problem free example; although their cost was in excess of $2,000. That price is likely not unreasonable for a rare, almost uncirculated example of this issue. The Bank of Selma spared no expense when it came to the printing of their bank notes; as the red ink notes were extremely expensive to produce in their day. From the $5 issue to the $100 note, I can think of no other series as beautiful. A wonderful bank to collect; provided one could locate the $50 and $100 issue. Not a single pinhole or other problem and as choice as one can get for the grade.

CHOICE

 FINE

 

 

Mkt

Grade:

 VF-25

 $425  

Reverse
Pic 2

    AL  $  5

  Bank of Selma

 

    R-292-1 CT

 

 

 

 

 January 1863

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Possibly Unique

 

CONTEMPORARY

 COUNTERFEIT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Selma

 Incredibly Rare

Brown ink serial # 3461. Dated Jan 1st 1863. Contemporary Counterfeit. I will point out differences in the genuine note and this excessively rare and perhaps unique contemporary counterfeit as I describe the note. Printed signatures. Brown ink serial number. The genuine issue utilizes brown ink in the entire date save for the "18" in 1862 which is engraved. The "1st Jan" and "62" is written in brown ink. The counterfeit bears an entire printed date save for the "3" in 1863. There were no Bank of Selma notes issued in 1863. As stated, all signatures upon the counterfeit are printed copies of the actual signatures appearing upon the genuine note. The "5" counters upon the dies at the top left and right are wrong. The counterfeit bears the 5's on an all red medallion; whereas the genuine note bears the two 5's on a black die surrounded by red. Further, the "5" and "FIVE" vivid red overprints seen on the genuine note are grey on the counterfeit. The only brown ink appearing anywhere at all upon the counterfeit are the serial number, 3461 and the "3" in 1863. The paper is of the period. The note appears to have been trimmed from a sheet of counterfeits of this issue, as it is cut tight at the bottom margin. This is not a photocopy or a copy made in modern times by someone. I absolutely, positively guarantee that this is a contemporary counterfeit made while the Bank of Selma was operating during the Civil War. Incredibly rare. While the note looks crude to us today; especially when compared to a genuine issue, you may rest assured that such was not the case 150++ years ago. All Southern obsolete counterfeits are excessively rare. The expertise to produce counterfeits was not present in the South during the Civil War. In fact, CSA Secretary of the Treasury, Memminger was forced to send for engravers abroad to produce Confederate Treasury notes after plates for the Montgomery issues were seized by Federal Authorities in New York. Most, if not all Confederate contemporary counterfeits were produced in the North and brought South. There are many other differences in the genuine $5 Bank of Selma issue and this contemporary counterfeit; although space limits me here. A note worthy of much more research and study. I have owned this note for nearly 40 years and again; provide a lifetime guarantee that it is contemporaneous to the period. I cannot overstate the rarity and desirability of this piece. Simply incredible and a delight to own. A museum quality piece of great numismatic significance. Very Fine  $1150  

Reverse

   AL  $ 50

  Commercial Bank

     of Alabama

 

     R-294-6

 

 

 

 

    Nov 23, 1858

 

 

 

 

      Selma

Serial # 1268. Dated November 23, 1858. Bank title at center top. Justice and Agriculture seated in center. Hope with anchor seated with sailor holding flag to left. Portrait of Phillip J. Weaver to lower right. Ornate red back. A most appealing example of this higher denomination Alabama issue. Trimmed tight at the right side, otherwise immaculate. For the most part, banks of this era printed far fewer higher denomination notes as compared to lower. The need for such notes was not as prevalent in everyday commerce as lower denomination pieces, such as $1, $5, 10 and $20. The note here offered is as clean as one could ever hope for and totally problem free. When viewing scans at the detail provided here; the least little anomaly can seem distracting or unnatural. The dark line seen at the upper third of the note from the back is merely contemporary ink. It is not a tear or a problem. Strong detail upon the back; as this design wore off the note rapidly. Locating clean, bright obsoletes of the nature offered here is much more difficult than many might think. A very nice example from this tough Alabama bank.

Very Fine

 

 

Mkt

Grade:

VF-35

 $395  

Reverse

  AL   10 cents

  Selma

 Stage Fare-

 MS & AL in CSA$$

    R-295-1

W.M. Gilmer Selma

No Serial number. Engraved date of August 10, 1862. Signed in brown ink by F. C. Taylor. An outstanding piece of Americana and "Receivable for Stage Fare in Alabama and Mississippi". To make the piece more interesting; the funds are payable in Confederate notes. A very solid piece without the usual separations and chinks most often encountered on rare pieces such as this one. While Rosene rates this piece a rarity 5 (11-25) known; I would respectfully disagree. The piece is not even pictured in Rosene and is much more scare than that. Problem free and exceptionally nice for such a note as this. Simply a superb piece of Civil War and American history. FINE+  $475  

Reverse


 

Please visit the Terms page to order.

randy@shipleyscurrency.com
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Mooresburg, TN 37811

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